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NPR

Arctic Sea Ice Melt Sets Record

More sea ice in the Arctic Ocean melted in the summer of 2012 than at any time since scientists began tracking the phenomenon. NPR science correspondent Richard Harris discusses how the historic loss of ice cover could affect weather conditions around the world.
NPR

A Berry So Shiny, It's Irresistible (And Inedible)

Birds are drawn to the blue berries of the tropical Pollia condensata plant; scientists are just as intrigued with the small shiny fruits. A recent study shows that the berries are more intensely reflective than any other living thing.
NPR

Vaccine For Dengue Fever Shows A Glimmer Of Hope

In a study with about 4,000 Thai schoolchildren, a vaccine for dengue fever works well against some strains of the dengue virus. But the overall level of protection was lower than hoped for. The results suggest that a vaccine for dengue fever can be developed eventually.
NPR

When Heat Kills: Global Warming As Public Health Threat

Emerging science shows that people respond more favorably to warnings about climate change when it's portrayed as a health issue rather than as an environmental problem. Should the symbol for danger be a child instead of a polar bear?
WAMU 88.5

Spice And Science: The Powerful Potential Of Turmeric

We explore the science behind tumeric, a powerful spice, and find out how we can incorporate it into our everyday dishes.

NPR

Sound A Major Emotional Driver For Humans

Seth Horowitz is an auditory neuroscientist at Brown University and author of the new book The Universal Sense. Horowitz says sound is a sense that's always "on" — and we take it for granted. He says it developed to trigger deeply-held emotions.
NPR

Want To Control Your Alcohol Intake? Ask For A Different Glass

The shape of the glass can fool a drinker into drinking more alcohol, but not so with soft drinks. New research shows that people were better able to calculate the halfway point of their beers in a straight glass.
NPR

Oregon Power Project Needs The Motion Of The Ocean

A generator that makes electricity from wave power is being prepared for installation some two and a half miles off the Oregon coast. Jason Busch, executive director of the Oregon Wave Energy Trust, discusses the project and why some Oregon residents are looking to the sea as a source of renewable energy.
NPR

Study May Link Pro Football, Brain Decline

Professional football players may have an increased risk of later dying from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and ALS, according to a new study in the journal Neurology. Everett Lehman, a researcher at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and co-author of the study, discusses the findings.

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