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Scientist Switches Position, Now Supports Keystone XL Pipeline

Opponents of the Keystone XL Pipeline lost an ally. David Greene talks to Marcia McNutt, one of the country's most influential scientists, about her decision to no longer oppose the pipeline.
NPR

Are More Eccentric Artists Perceived As Better Artists?

A study finds part of the reason people love Lady Gaga and Vincent Van Gogh is that these are very eccentric artists, and people have strong, unconscious stereotypes that eccentric artists are better.
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'Piglet Smoothie' Fed To Sows To Prevent Disease; Activists Outraged

Undercover footage shows a hog farm feeding sows ground-up piglets that succumbed to a deadly virus. Veterinarians say it's the only method they have to protect herds against a fast-spreading disease.
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Men Who Vandalized Egyptian Pyramid To Prove Theory Face Charges

Two German men filmed themselves scraping off samples of the Great Pyramid in hopes of proving their theory that it was built 20,000 years ago by people from the legendary city of Atlantis.
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Deep Learning: Teaching Computers To Tell Things Apart

The first step in recognizing people could be telling the difference between a cat and a dog. Facebook is investing in artificial intelligence research, with the hopes of better sorting your photos.
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Keystone Greens See Pipeline As Crucial Test For Obama

This week's North American Summit is refocusing attention on the proposal to build the Keystone XL pipeline. The issue's proved to be complicated for President Obama to navigate among green activists.
NPR

Scientists Fear Ecological Disaster In Nicaragua's Planned Canal

The head of Nicaragua's Academy of Sciences says the plan for a new Central American shipping channel seems so crazy that he's having trouble persuading conservation groups to take it seriously.
NPR

Nebraska To Appeal Ruling That Blocks Keystone Pipeline In State

TransCanada, the company in charge of the pipeline extension, says it is "disappointed" by the decision but will await the outcome of the appeals process.
NPR

As Execution Drugs Run Dry, Attention Turns To Source Of Shortage

The U.S. is experiencing a nationwide shortage of the drugs commonly used in lethal injections. The situation has stirred controversy not only in the U.S. but in Europe, as well.
NPR

'Bluish' Light May Help Alzheimer's Patients Find Bearings

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is trying to help Alzheimer's patients experience fewer behavioral issues. Robert Siegel speaks with researcher Mariana Figueiro and psychiatrist Guerman Ermolenko.

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