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How You Move Your Arm Says Something About Who You Are

A part of the brain called the premotor cortex does some pretty complicated work. It's where the brain plans and strategizes about how to take action, and it may also reflect a person's personality.
NPR

Warmer Water Culprit In Greenland Glacier Break

Audie Cornish speaks with Dr. H. Jay Zwally, a NASA glaciologist, about the latest break of ice off of the Petermann Glacier in Greenland.
NPR

Terrible Virus, Fascinating History In 'Rabid'

Journalist Bill Wasik and his veterinarian wife, Monica Murphy, have teamed up for a new book on the cultural and scientific history of rabies. Rabies causes terrible suffering — but it's fascinating to examine the way the virus is perfectly engineered to spread itself.
NPR

High-Tech Shortcut To Greek Yogurt Leaves Purists Fuming

Greek yogurt sales are booming in the U.S., and some companies are turning to new technology to get in on it. But some Greek yogurt purists who compete with those companies for market share say the products are not the same.
NPR

When Art Meets Science, You'll Get The Picture

Sure, you've got a world-changing idea — but can you explain it? This new collaboration challenges artists to illuminate the inventions of young scientists.
NPR

Interactive: Mapping The U.S. Drought

More than half the country is experiencing drought conditions, some of them severe. Use this interactive map to see how the drought has covered the country — and how the conditions today compare to the past.
NPR

Can Adding Iron To Oceans Slow Global Warming?

The process can cause blooms of algae that have the potential to soak up huge amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. A new study says this algae then drops to the sea floor, but some researchers caution that it's hard to track what happens to carbon in the ocean, and so-called "seeding" could have negative side effects.

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