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Spacewalk Planned To Repair Station's Leaky Cooling System

Astronauts discovered an ammonia leak in a system designed to keep the International Space Station's power supply cool.
WAMU 88.5

Scientific Advances In Prosthetic Limbs

How technological and medical advances in prosthetic limbs are changing lives.

WAMU 88.5

Dr. Allen Frances: "Saving Normal: An Insider's Revolt Against Out-Of-Control Psychiatric Diagnosis, DSM-5, Big Pharma, And The Medicalization Of Ordinary Life"

A leading psychiatrist argues that too many people are being diagnosed as mentally ill. Dr. Allen Frances joins Diane to discuss the problems of over-diagnosis and over-medication.

NPR

Atop A Hawaiian Mountain, A Constant Sniff For Carbon Dioxide

Since 1958, researchers have been measuring the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere at the Mauna Loa Observatory. The remote outpost has just reported a carbon dioxide level of 400 parts per million — the highest it has climbed in the modern age.
NPR

Kids With Autism Quick To Detect Motion

To test a common theory about the cause of autism, researchers recently studied how kids with autism process moving images. They found that the kids saw simple movements twice as fast as their typically developing peers.
NPR

'Dangerous Territory': Carbon Dioxide Levels Reach Milestone

The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has crossed the "psychological threshold" of 400 parts per million. That number is one of the clearest measures of how humans are changing the planet by burning fossil fuels.
NPR

Experts Percolate on How To Brew Coffee

Sam Penix and Sam Lewontin, of Everyman Espresso in New York City, and Harold McGee, author of On Food and Cooking, explain how to get the most out of your grounds. The brewmasters discuss brewing devices, from wood necks to chemex, and filter out reasons you might choose one over another.
NPR

Exploring An Ever-Expanding Universe

Saul Perlmutter shared the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics for his discovery that the universe was expanding at an accelerating rate. Perlmutter explains how supernovae and other astronomical artifacts are used to measure the expansion rate, and explains what physicists are learning about "dark energy" — the mysterious entity thought to be driving the acceleration.

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