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With Rising Seas, America's Birthplace Could Disappear

By the end of the century, ocean levels could rise by 2 or 3 feet. That's enough to flood the colonists' first settlement at Jamestown, Va. And it's putting pressure on archaeologists to get as many artifacts out of the ground as quickly as possible — before it's too late.

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The Promise And Limitations Of Telemedicine

Telemedicine is nothing new, but advancements in technology have made it even more widely available. Neurologists can now treat Parkinson's patients from miles away, therapists can reach service members overseas, and general practitioners can work in rural areas without actually going there at all.
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Chris Hadfield: Space Chef In Chief

The Canadian astronaut didn't just tweet and sing his heart out during his five months as commander of the International Space Station. He also took time out to show the world what it's like to eat up there.
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Maybe It's Time To Swap Burgers For Bugs, Says U.N.

A new report makes the case that insects may be essential to feeding a planet of 7 billion people. Why? They're nutritious, better for the environment than other protein sources and can generate jobs, according to the U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization.
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Is It Safe To Use Compost Made From Treated Human Waste?

Treated human waste has been used on farmland for decades, but the ick factor has not entirely faded. Some environmentalists think the treatment process may not get rid of all the harmful contaminants that could be in the waste.
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For Year-Round Buzz, Beekeepers 'Fast-Forward Darwinism'

Honeybees are in trouble across the U.S., but one association in Massachusetts is hoping to boost the population in its own area. The bees it currently uses have a hard time surviving the winter and battling other foes that have been killing bees nationwide. So beekeepers in Plympton decided to breed their own.
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Schools? How About A Science Laureate At The Super Bowl?

There's a move in Congress to name a science laureate. Astronomer Mike Brown hopes that person would do much more than visit schools to encourage kids to consider careers in science. He'd like to see a laureate reach out to the public in all sorts of ways.
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Astronauts Go On Spacewalk To Fix Ammonia Leak

NASA sent two astronauts on a spacewalk Saturday to fix an ammonia leak in one of International Space Station's power systems.
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Science To Get Its Very Own Promoter, Thanks To Congress

The U.S. Senate and House of Representatives managed to overcome their differences on a less contentious issue this week. Both acted in a bipartisan fashion this week to approve bills calling on the government to create a science laureate position. He or she would promote science in the same way a poet laureate promotes poetry. Host Scott Simon talks to Cal Tech Astronomy professor Mike Brown about the proposal.

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