Science | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Science

RSS Feed
NPR

Younger Women Have Rising Rate Of Advanced Breast Cancer, Study Says

Only about 800 women younger than 40 get the kind of breast cancer that has spread to bones or other organs by the time it's diagnosed. But that number tripled in a generation, and scientists are left wondering what's the cause.
NPR

Investigator: BP Wasn't Prepared For Disasters At Deepwater Oil Wells

Tuesday marked the second day of a civil trial connected to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion and oil spill in New Orleans. With opening statements over, plaintiffs began calling witnesses. Melissa Block talks to Jeff Brady.
NPR

Scientists Discover 'Ghost Continent' Under Layers Of Rock In Indian Ocean

Melissa Block speaks with Sid Perkins, a freelance writer specializing in earth sciences, about the recent discovery of a "lost microcontinent" submerged beneath the Indian Ocean.
NPR

To Build An Empire, Hold The Anchovies

Civilization cannot live on anchovies alone. The ancient Norte Chico people of Peru were long thought to have built a complex society in South America while dining on a diet based on the tiny fish. But archaeologists now say they ate the food that fueled empires throughout the hemisphere — corn.
WAMU 88.5

US Health Care Costs

What makes U.S. health care so expensive: Understanding the complex pricing schemes that drive up costs, create an enormous tax burden and bankrupt households.

NPR

Scientists Trace Origin Of Destructive Russia Meteor

The Chelyabinsk meteor was part of a group of Earth-crossing objects known as Apollo asteroids, scientists believe.
NPR

Underwater Hunger Artist: Giant Isopod Fasts For 4 Years

From Japan comes news of a giant isopod that knows all there is to know about the hunger game. How else to explain the fasting behavior of the animal that, his minders say, hasn't eaten in more than 1,500 days? The male giant isopod, known simply as No. 1, last ate on Jan. 2, 2009 — or, to put it in perspective, 18 days before President Obama began his first term.
NPR

To Spot Kids Who Will Overcome Poverty, Look At Babies

Researchers say that the heartbeats and breathing of babies may help identify the kids most likely to struggle with poverty later on. Biology matters, the scientists say, but so does baby's relationship with Mom.

Pages