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Wal-Mart To Pay $81 Million For Hazardous Waste Dumping

The retail giant pleaded guilty to improperly disposing of toxic pollutants in California and Missouri in the period 2003 to 2005.
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Why Do Whistle-Blowers Become Whistle-Blowers?

Management gurus have long preached the value of ethical leadership. In the presence of ethical leadership — but the absence of ethical co-workers — what happens to people's honesty?
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The Business And Science Of Storm Shelters

There are no definitive numbers on how many people were saved by storm shelters in the deadly tornado in Moore, Okla. There's little doubt that those who sought cover in previously-installed underground shelters and safe rooms were protected. Still, most people in high-risk areas don't have them.
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Beneath A Glacier's White, Researchers See Green

Underneath a receding glacier in the Canadian Arctic, researchers found something surprising: a kind of plant related to moss that was not only still green, but also growing.
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Scientists Trace Source Of Famed Irish Potato Famine

We now know what caused the Irish potato famine. Scientists have pinpointed the pathogen by using plant samples collected in the mid-19th century. Weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden talks about it with the study's co-author, Sophien Kamoun of the Sainsbury Lab in the United Kingdom.
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Ring Nebula Is More Like A Jelly Doughnut, NASA Says

The Ring Nebula, whose iconic shape and large size make it a favorite of amateur astronomers, can now be seen in new detail, after NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured a sharp image of the nebula. Researchers say the new clarity reveals details that were previously unseen, and a structure that's more complex than scientists believed.
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Study Is First To Chart Amphibian Populations' Decline In U.S.

Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are declining at an average rate of 3.7 percent each year, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study released this week.
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'Crazy Ants' Spreading In The Southeastern US

In parts of the southeastern US, aggressive fire ants have been driven out by an even more recent arrival, the tawny crazy ant. Edward LeBrun, a researcher at the University of Texas at Austin, describes the newcomers and how one invasive species can out-invade another.

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