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'Frankenstein's Cat': Bioengineering The Animals Of The Future

Science journalist Emily Anthes talks about how scientists are engineering mice with tumors and working to create pigs that can grow organs for human transplant and insects that could serve as drones for the military.
NPR

Hardening Of Human Arteries Turns Out To Be A Very Old Story

Living like a hunter-gatherer won't guarantee you'll be free of heart disease, according to a study of ancient human remains. Scans of mummies from preindustrial Egypt, Peru, the American Southwest and Alaska's Aleutian Islands finds evidence of hardened arteries thousands of yeas ago.
NPR

New Voices For The Voiceless: Synthetic Speech Gets An Upgrade

For those who rely on technology to speak, there are a limited number of voices. "Perfect Paul" sounds robotic, and "Heather" can seem too old for some. Now, a researcher is using sound samples from people who have never been able to speak to create new, personalized voices for them.
NPR

Are There Too Many Ph.D.s And Not Enough Jobs?

Our country needs more people with science, math and engineering degrees — at least, that's the common refrain among politicians and educators. Yet new numbers show people with doctoral degrees in those subjects increasingly struggle to find employment.
NPR

Scientists Make Plans To Blast Threatening Asteroids

The recent meteor blast in Russia has brought renewed attention to the risk posed by meteors on a collision course with Earth. NASA and the European Space Agency are working on a plan to develop a rocket that could collide with an asteroid and knock it off course. Dr. Andrew Cheng of the John Hopkins Applied Physics Lab, who is leading the initiative, talks about it with host Jacki Lyden.
NPR

Young Adult Prairie Dogs Dig Living In Mom's Basement

Most animals leave their home turf when they reach adulthood to avoid competing with relatives. But here's an exception. More than three decades of dogged research shows that prairie dogs are more likely to disperse when all their family members are gone.
NPR

In Open Source Rocket Competition, Collaboration Takes Off

The challenge, launching during the SXSW festival Saturday, asks anyone with an Internet connection to try to create a rocket engine. The 3-D designs can be edited by users around the globe, a model the organizers hope will decrease the cost of space innovation and unleash "untapped potential around the world."
NPR

Could A 'Brain Pacemaker' Someday Treat Severe Anorexia?

Neurosurgeons are testing whether electrodes implanted deep inside a patient's brain could help treat chronic anorexia. Doctors are searching for something to help in these hard cases, and a small experiment, with just a half-dozen women, is drawing attention.

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