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NPR

Family Tree Of Pertussis Traced, Could Lead To Better Vaccine

Scientists tracking the ancestry of whooping cough say it arose abruptly in humans about 500 years ago, caused by a mutated bacterium that once lived only in animals. Genetic tricks helped it spread.
NPR

'Don't Touch Me,' Said Canada. 'I Won't!' Said The USA. So They Moved 20 Feet Apart

Canada and the USA agreed to create a 20-foot-wide corridor between them that runs for 5,500 continuous miles. Cartographers drew the line straight, but engineers built it crooked. Take a look.
NPR

'Blood Victory' In Medical Research Dispute

The Havasupai Native American tribe celebrated Blood Victory Day this week. That's the anniversary of their legal victory over researchers who misused members' blood samples without proper consent.
WAMU 88.5

To See Stars, Arlington Students Ask You To Dim The Lights Saturday Night

Light pollution washes out all but the brightest stars in the D.C. area, something a group of Arlington sixth graders are hoping to change for just 30 minutes on Saturday night.

NPR

Got My Goat? Vermont Farms Put Fresh Meat On Refugee Tables

Americans don't eat much barbecued goat, but the meat is a mainstay in many African, Asian and Caribbean diets. In Vermont, farmers raise it for refugees and immigrants, and hope to mainstream it.
NPR

Radioactive Leak At U.S. Waste Dump Was Preventable, Report Says

The Feb. 14 release of radioactive material at the facility in New Mexico that contaminated 21 workers was due to poor management and lack of oversight, the Department of Energy says.
NPR

Scientists Pinpoint Source Of Antarctic 'Quack'

For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
NPR

Why Are We Spiteful, Even Though It Bites Us Back?

Most of us aren't as maleficent as the fairy in "Sleeping Beauty," but we're still apt to spite others, even at risk of harming ourselves. Psychologists are trying to figure out why.
NPR

Blockbuster Trades Are Changing The Face Of Pharmaceuticals

Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
NPR

What Spooked The Subs Of The '60s? Quacking Whales

In the '60s, submarines picked up a mysterious quacking sound in the Southern Ocean. This "bio-duck," as it came to be known, has been heard on and off ever since, but scientists haven't been able to trace it — until now. New research shows that the quack is coming from minke whales, but researchers still don't know why.

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