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Curiosity 2.0? NASA Announces New Mars Rover Plans

It has been an exciting week for planetary scientists, ranging from the discovery of water ice on Mercury to the announcement of a new Mars rover mission in 2020. Jim Green, director of NASA's planetary science division, and scientist Matthew Siegler discuss the latest news.
NPR

Blue Whale Barrel Roll Caught On Camera

Reporting in the journal Biology Letters, Jeremy Goldbogen and colleagues say blue whales perform underwater acrobatics when they're eating: they rotate 360 degrees while they gulp krill. Reaching 90 feet in length, blue whales are the largest animals on the planet. Goldbogen is studying their dining habits to understand what fuels their growth.
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When It Comes To Boxed Wine, The Cooler, The Better

From swill of the wine world to hipster fame, boxed wine is growing in popularity. But research suggests that its major impediment is temperature. When stored in the heat, the box ages faster than the bottle, scientists say.
NPR

Is Another Moon Mission Written In The Stars?

It's been 40 years since NASA launched Apollo 17, its final human mission to the moon. The commander of that mission says he'd love to give up his claim to fame as "the last man on the moon" but concedes that it probably won't happen in his lifetime. And future trips might be run by companies in the private sector.
NPR

World Bank Issues Alarming Climate Report

Countries attending U.N. climate talks were not able to come up with any major agreements on reducing carbon emissions and slowing global warming. This comes after the World Bank issued a report predicting global temperatures could rise by 7.2 degrees Fahrenheit by the end of the century — possibly sooner if current promises to curb emission are not kept. Renee Montagne talks about this with World Bank President Jim Yong Kim.
NPR

Perfection Is Skin Deep: Everyone Has Flawed Genes

Researchers found a surprising number of mutations, including several associated with disease, in the genes of normal healthy people. Their study raises questions about whether widespread genetic sequencing could end up scaring people for no good reason.
NPR

Fruit Fly Nose Says Steer Clear Of Deadly Food; Human Nose Not So Reliable

Although we can usually smell when food goes bad, humans just don't have the fruit fly's direct path from nose to brain that alerts it to food poison. But the detection of this pathway could someday lead to more research that could help us develop better bug repellants.
NPR

Hours After A Meal, It's The Memory That Matters

What a person remembers of a meal hours later, not the actual calories consumed, matters more when it comes to hunger. Eating while watching TV sets us up to eat more food than we should, but a new experiment shows how manipulating our memories of a meal can change how hungry we feel.
NPR

Why It's Easier To Scam The Elderly

New research suggests older adults may have less activity in the area of the brain that processes risk and subtle danger. Another possible reason older adults don't pick up on warning signs is an increasing bias against negativity.

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