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What Drove Early Man Across Globe? Climate Change

Some of the biggest human migrations coincided with major changes in climate, according to a new analysis. Researchers say early humans set out in search of climates where more food was available. And some populations stayed put in certain locations because barriers like glaciers blocked their progress.
NPR

Shriveled Mich. Apple Harvest Means Fewer Jobs, Tough Year Ahead

After a mild winter and a late-April freeze, Michigan's apple harvest was decimated. Less fruit means fewer picking jobs. It also means little to no income from apples in storage that growers rely on to get them through to next year's harvest.
NPR

Astronauts Return From Space Station, As An American Takes Command

U.S. astronaut Sunita Williams is now in command of the International Space Station, after receiving control of the facility this weekend. Three departing astronauts whose capsule left the station early Monday landed safely three and a half hours later.
NPR

Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform

Teachers' expectations about their students' abilities affect classroom interactions in myriad ways that can impact student performance. Students expected to succeed, for example, get more time to answer questions and more specific feedback. But training aimed at changing teaching behavior can also help change expectations.
NPR

Microbes Benefit More Than Just The Gut

Reporting in Science Translational Medicine, researchers write that healthy sinuses are populated by a diverse population of bacteria, including Lactobacillus species. Study author Susan Lynch discusses whether a microbial spray might be a good cure for the sniffles.
NPR

Detecting the 'Artful Dodge'

During the Republican debates, Mitt Romney told a moderator "You get to ask the questions you want. I get to give the answers I want." Social psychologist Todd Rogers talks about how likely voters are to notice a subtle dodge. James Fowler joins to discuss whether social media can send more people to the polls.

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