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SpaceX Dragon May Ferry Astronauts By 2015

SpaceX's Dragon capsule has travelled safely to the International Space Station and back. The next step, says Space.com writer Clara Moskowitz, is to outfit the capsule for crew, which SpaceX hopes to complete by 2015. Until then US astronauts will hitch rides on Russia's Soyuz, at about $60 million a pop.
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Ex-Spy Telescopes May Aid Hunt For Dark Energy

Last year, the National Reconnaissance Office gave NASA a gift--two declassified spy telescopes, each higher in quality than anything NASA has ever produced for space. NASA astrophysics director Paul Hertz and Caltech theoretical physicist Sean Carroll discuss how the telescopes could be used to hunt for elusive dark matter and dark energy.
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What Happens When Two Galaxies Collide?

In four billion years, the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies will collide, according to a study in the Astrophysical Journal. Roeland van der Marel, an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute, talks about how this discovery was made, and the fate of our solar system.
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'Eliminate Dengue' Team Has A Deep (Lab) Bench

Australian researcher Scott O'Neill is leading a charge to rid the world of dengue fever. And it's a real team sport, he says: "We don't work in isolation in any projects in science these days. The days of having someone beavering away by themselves in the backroom have long gone."
NPR

New Fetal Genetics Test: Less Risk, More Controversy

Scientists have deciphered the entire genetic code of a fetus, taking a sample from the mother's blood. While less risky than current alternatives, it also leaps into the abortion debate, with parents eventually having the option to test for all kinds of traits.
NPR

A Scientist's 20-Year Quest To Defeat Dengue Fever

Scott O'Neill's big idea to rid the world of dengue is both clever and complex: He wants to infect mosquitoes with bacteria so they can't carry the virus that causes the disease. "I was incredibly persistent in not wanting to give this idea up," he says. But advances aren't easy: "It's incredibly frustrating work."

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