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NPR

The City As Engine: Energy, Entropy And The Triumph Of Disorder

The second law of thermodynamics is a kind of warning to cities and civilization. No matter how clever we are, disorder, waste and pollution will always follow from our work organizing societies into cities.
NPR

How A Biofuel Dream Called Jatropha Came Crashing Down

People thought the hardy Jatropha tree was the answer to the food v. fuel debate, until it wasn't. Financial hard times and a misunderstanding revealed this biofuel to be like all the rest — in need of good food and water.
NPR

High School Daze: The Perils Of Sacrificing Sleep For Late-Night Studying

A new study finds that when teens don't get the sleep they need on a given night, the next day all kinds of things can go poorly. The study builds on a body of evidence that finds sleep and learning are inextricably linked.
NPR

Wood Energy Not 'Green' Enough, Says Mass.

Wind and solar get lots of attention, but another kind of renewable power actually creates more energy in our country --wood. The state of Massachusetts on Friday decided that these plants aren't green enough to get some special breaks.
NPR

Examining The Truth About Rape And Pregnancy

All Things Considered host Melissa Block talks with Nick Baumann of Mother Jones magazine about the belief at the core of Missouri state Rep. Todd Akin's furor-raising statement over the weekend: that "legitimate rape" rarely leads to pregnancy. The belief that hormones or adrenaline protect women from conception during rape has been perpetuated for decades in American political discourse, without scientific basis. Studies have found approximately 5 percent of rapes result in pregnancy.
WAMU 88.5

Climate Services

Tech Tuesday explores how government planners, farmers, energy companies and a range of other businesses use climate and weather data for short and long-range planning.

WAMU 88.5

Stuart Firestein: "Ignorance: How It Drives Science" (Rebroadcast)

A neuroscientist claims that ignorance--not knowledge--is the true engine of science. He explains how scientists use ignorance to concentrate their research, and why "not knowing" is one of the greatest benefits to science.

NPR

How Much Does A Hamburger Cost? That Depends

There are many informational graphics demonstrating the environmental impact of beef consumption. But a lot of the numbers just don't match up. As it turns out, calculating what goes into (and comes out of) a cow is not an exact science.

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