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Ancient Plague's DNA Revived From A 1,500-Year-Old Tooth

When you hear the words bubonic plague, the Black Death usually comes to mind. But the first plague pandemic happened 800 years earlier, when the Justinian plague wiped out nearly a quarter of the world's population. Scientists have decoded the bacteria responsible, which had roots in China.
NPR

China's Jade Rabbit Rover May Be Doomed On The Moon

Chinese officials recently announced the rover was experiencing mechanical difficulties, and now observers believe its done for. But the thirst for more moon missions may be spreading in China.
NPR

Entrepreneurs Looking For 'Windfall' Cash In On Climate Change

A new book explores the ways melting Arctic ice yield new shipping channels, new oil and gas resources — and potential profits. Journalist McKenzie Funk delves into the "booming business of global warming" in Windfall.
NPR

Stricter Autism Criteria Unlikely To Reduce Services For Kids

Researchers say changes rolled out last May are likely to have a bigger effect on government statistics than on the care of the nation's children. Still, advocates worry that narrower definitions could lead to a loss of coverage for some children.
NPR

You'd Think We'd Have Baby-Making All Figured Out, But No

Many women don't know when they're most likely to get pregnant each month, and some think certain positions will boost the odds, a survey finds. There are also big gaps in knowledge about risk factors for infertility and birth defects.
NPR

Soil, Weedkillers And GMOs: When Numbers Don't Tell The Whole Story

Numbers don't lie, but they can sometimes tell a misleading story. Three times in the past week, we came across farm statistics that painted a picture not quite backed up by facts on the ground.
NPR

Grand Canyon May Be Older (And Younger) Than You Think

About 6 million years ago, a new mineral analysis suggests, a mighty river zigzagging across the Colorado plateau may have found its way into older gorges, greatly enlarging them to create the West's most spectacular canyon. Still, some geologists aren't sold.
NPR

A Reading Teacher Who Lost The Ability To Read

After a reading specialist at a kindergarten outside Chicago had a series of small strokes, she could no longer read. She's using her skills to teach herself how to recognize words again, but those who suffer from alexia face a long road back to literacy.
NPR

Mars Rover Turns 3-Month Mission Into Decade Of Exploration

Opportunity, NASA's Mars Rover, landed on Mars on Jan. 24, 2004. It was supposed to be a three-month mission, but 10 years later the rover is still investigating the red planet and sending data and images back to NASA. Jim Bell, an astronomer at Arizona State University, talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about Opportunity's decade on Mars.
NPR

Pig Virus Continues To Spread, Raising Fears Of Pricier Bacon

Porcine epidemic diarrhea, or PED, virus has killed about 1 million baby pigs in the U.S. since April. Its effect on the pork industry is small so far, but analysts say it could send pork prices rising if it isn't controlled.

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