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Before Deep Space, NASA Heads Deep Under Water

NASA may have retired its shuttles, but it has its sights on sending astronauts deeper into space than ever before. The agency wants to set foot on asteroids, but the first step is a soggy one.
NPR

To Grow A Craft Beer Business, The Secret's In The Water

It's a good time to be a craft brewer, as Americans are thirsty for full-flavored and local beers. But when small breweries grow, they can also risk losing some of the "craftiness" their fans love. And when they expand, many brewers have to rewrite their recipes — starting with the water.
NPR

Growling With The Gorillas: A Rwanda Mountain Trek

Gorillas often get a bad rap, but folks who work with them say they're as much gentle as giant. On a recent trip to scope out the primates, an NPR producer trekked into the Virunga mountains of East Africa, where more than half of the world's mountain gorillas live.
NPR

U.S. Military's Green Energy Criticized By Congress

The White House and military brass are calling for the development of alternative energy. One goal is cutting dependence on foreign sources. Another is reducing the carbon footprint of the largest fossil fuel consumer in the world. But now some on Capitol Hill are blocking the effort to green the military. Audie Cornish talks with Juliette Kayyem of the Boston Globe about the fight.
NPR

Is Japanese Dock A Noah's Ark Or A Trojan Horse?

About 100 tons of marine life rode aboard the huge concrete dock that washed ashore in Oregon earlier this week. Marine biologists were shocked to see that Japanese coastal species survived the trans-Pacific trek, but they are also worried about the risk for invasive species.
NPR

How 'Flame' Malware Hijacks A Computer

Russian antivirus firm Kaspersky Lab has discovered a piece of malware infecting computers mostly in the Middle East. Flame eavesdrops on conversations, takes screenshots and steals data from infected computers without being detected. Wired's Kim Zetter discusses how the malicious code works.
NPR

The Winning Answer To A Burning Question

Alan Alda challenged scientists to explain what a flame is to an 11-year-old. Three months and more than 800 entries later he is back with the winner of the contest. Ira Flatow and guests discuss the winning entry and why the contest was an effective exercise in science communication.

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