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There are some truths that we believe in wholeheartedly — but what if we're completely wrong? Once we separate fact from fiction, how do our perceptions change? In this hour, TED speakers move beyond conventional wisdom to reveal complex realities about what we think we know to be true.

A Rancher And A Conservationist Forge An Unlikely Alliance

Scientists suspect that warming air and rivers, as well as smaller winter snowpack, is endangering western trout. But on a ranch in Montana, methods to protect trout from the effects of cattle ranching are helping the trout become more resilient to the inevitable change in their environment.

Bacterial Competition In Lab Shows Evolution Never Stops

Day after day, workers at Michigan State University care for and feed colonies of evolving bacteria. The original microbes have produced more than 50,000 generations in the 25 years since the experiment began. Despite predictions the bacteria might someday reach a point where they would evolve no more, the results show they keep changing.

What's The Most Important Thing Food Labels Should Tell Us?

Food labels have become battlegrounds. Government regulators, companies and food movement activists have been fighting over what belongs on the label. (GMOs? Trans fats? Claims that bran prevents heart disease?) We asked four big thinkers for their dream food label.

Electric Cars Drive Demand For Cheaper, More Powerful Batteries

Unlike the technologies in laptops, smartphones and electric cars, the batteries inside them have been slow to evolve. In Silicon Valley, more than 40 companies are working on finding a battery breakthrough. And they're facing international competition.

Old Dogs, New Data: Canines May Have Been Domesticated In Europe

A study of DNA extracted from wolf and dog fossils suggests that ancient wolf populations in Europe are the direct ancestors of most modern-day domestic dogs. The study suggests wolves became dogs between 18,800 and 32,100 years ago, before the start of agriculture.
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This Week On Metro Connection: House And Home

We'll look at the places that shelter us and the symbolism behind our humble abodes as we bring you a show about "House and Home."


As Climate Warms American West, Iconic Trout In Jeopardy

In the northern Rockies of Montana, wildlife is a part of daily conversation. Fishing alone generates $250 million a year, and the pursuit of trout brings in most of that money. But record droughts and declining snowpack mean streams are becoming less habitable for this revered fish.

Print Your Own Revolutionary War Boat, In 3-D

The Smithsonian Institution has millions of fossils, sculptures and other historic artifacts in its vast collections. Twenty of them are now available for 3-D printing — and viewing from every conceivable angle — online.

Could Hunger Make Us More Charitable?

Hunger can make many people "hangry," or irritable. But new research suggests that we may have another, innate response to hunger: a desire to help others in need.