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Organic Cat Litter Chief Suspect In Nuclear Waste Accident

The release of plutonium at a New Mexico nuclear dump may have been caused by a bad purchase at the pet shop.
NPR

Uncertainty Swirls Saturday's Predicted Meteor Shower

Alan MacRobert of Sky and Telescope magazine says that Earth on Saturday may pass through relatively dense streams of debris, resulting in a vivid display of shooting stars — or it won't.
NPR

California's Drought Isn't Making Food Cost More. Here's Why

California produces most of America's vegetables and nuts. Yet there's little sign the drought there is creating food shortages in the U.S., because farmers are rationing water and draining aquifers.
NPR

Sushi's Secret: Why We Get Hooked On Raw Fish

We love raw seafood but can't stand uncooked fowl or pork. Why? A big part of it is the effective lack of gravity in water, a scientist says. Weightlessness gives fish muscles a smooth, soft texture.
NPR

Tonight's New 'Giraffes' Meteor Shower Could Be A Great One

Astronomers say an all-new meteor shower could put on a show for much of the U.S., starting as early as 10:30 p.m. ET Friday. The Camelopardalids shower is named after the giraffe constellation.
WAMU 88.5

Bill Nye "The Science Guy" (Rebroadcast)

Bill Nye, a Washington native, joins Kojo to discuss how he got hooked on science and what he thinks can draw future generations into STEM fields.

NPR

Overexposed? Camera Phones Could Be Washing Out Our Memories

When you snap lots of photos, psychologists say you're subconsciously relying on the camera to remember the experience for you. And your memory, they say, may suffer because of it.
NPR

Mars Weathercam Spots Big New Crater

A scientist monitoring Martian weather for the Opportunity rover team noticed an inconspicuous dark patch that turned out to be a new impact crater half the size of a football field.
NPR

NOAA Predicts Relatively Quiet Atlantic Hurricane Season

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration expects a relatively quiet Atlantic hurricane season, with three to six hurricanes developing between June 1 and the end of November. Forecasters say they expect El Nino conditions to develop in the coming months, which should produce winds in the Atlantic that discourage hurricane formation.
NPR

Big Flightless Birds Come From High-Flying Ancestors

We're sure glad ostriches and emus don't fly. But DNA evidence now suggests their small ancestors flew to each continent, where they evolved independently into giants with stubby wings.

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