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Hating On Fat People Just Makes Them Fatter

Some people rationalize that it's all right to shame or blame someone who's overweight because it will motivate the victim to lose pounds. News for the slim and smug: It doesn't work, and it's not OK.
NPR

MERS Virus Update

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an illness caused by a newly discovered virus in the same family as SARS. Most of the documented cases have come from Saudi Arabia, which has seen a 54 percent mortality rate in those patients. Martin Cetron, director of the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses the emerging virus.
NPR

Cyclo-What? A Nasty Stomach Bug Spreads In The Midwest

A rare parasite has sickened at least 315 people across 14 states, health officials said. The culprit is cyclospora, a food-borne bug that causes wicked diarrhea. People typically catch the parasite from contaminated produce, but the source of this outbreak is still unknown.
NPR

Don't Blame Your Lousy Night's Sleep On The Moon — Yet

Over drinks in the light of a full moon, a group of Swiss sleep researchers recently realized they could put a bit of folklore about the moon's disruptive effect on sleep to the test. The answer surprised them, and didn't quite win over some other scientists in the field.
NPR

Why Mosquitoes Love Me, And Other Mysteries Revealed

Dr. Roger Nasci, a mosquito expert at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says you don't necessarily need repellent with a high percentage of DEET to keep the 'skeeters away. Repellant still works well in low doses, and so far mosquitoes aren't growing resistant to it.
NPR

If You Want A Donut Hole, Don't Ask A Mathematician

For bakers, turning a donut into a donut hole is simple. For a mathematician, it's impossible.
NPR

Steam And Groundwater Raise Concern At Japanese Nuclear Plant

Water in all its forms has caused trouble at the ruined Fukushima nuclear plant this week. They are reminders that the problems are far from over.
NPR

La. Flood Board Sues Oil Industry For Destroying Wetlands

Since the 1930s, Louisiana has steadily been losing land that protects the city from hurricanes and other disasters. So the government group charged with shielding New Orleans from flooding sued about 100 oil and gas companies on Wednesday for their role in damaging coastal wetlands.
NPR

What's Swimming In The River? Just Look For DNA

Biologists have discovered they can track hard-to-see species in streams, ponds and even the ocean by sampling the water for DNA. Scientists say the technique is an important conservation tool: So far, it's been used to track declining giant salamanders and even locate a rare whale.
NPR

Being In The Minority Can Cost You And Your Company

Social scientists recently made an interesting discovery: The wage gap between blacks and whites (working identical jobs) varies greatly by location.

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