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NPR

Buzz Off: Bedbugs Unfazed By Ultrasonic Devices

Once bedbugs settle in, the toll on your mental health and pocketbook can run high. So what about driving the bloodsucking insects off with high-pitched sounds? Scientists say gadgets that claim to do that are a waste of money.
NPR

Forget Extinct: The Brontosaurus Never Even Existed

Even if you knew that, you may not know how the fictional dinosaur came to star in the prehistoric landscape of popular imagination for so long. The story starts 130 years ago, in a time known as the "Bone Wars."
NPR

At Doha Climate Talks, Modest Results At Best

Diplomats in Doha, Qatar, are working late into the night to hammer out a deal in the 18th round of U.N. climate talks. Expectations are low as the talks are part of a multiyear process to make a transition from the fading Kyoto climate treaty to something that engages all nations of the world.
NPR

Positive Fracking Study Was Funded By Gas Company

A report that shed favorable light on fracking is at the center of a controversy at the University of Texas. The head of the school's Energy Institute has stepped down and another professor has retired after an investigation found numerous errors and flaws in the report — and undisclosed conflicts of interest.
WAMU 88.5

Debate Over The Benefits Of Routine Mammograms

The availability of 3-D mammograms renews debate about who should get them and when: Calculating the health benefits of routine mammograms.

NPR

Unlocking A Frozen Lake's Bacterial Secrets

What does life truly need to survive? Writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Alison Murray and colleagues describe a community of unusual bacteria that survive under 20 meters of ice in the dark, salty, sub-freezing waters of Lake Vida, Antarctica.
NPR

No Joke

Why Even Tragedy Gets A Laugh — When comedian Tig Notaro found out she had breast cancer, she incorporated the grim news into her stand-up routine--and got quite a few laughs from the audience. Notaro and neuroscientist Robert Provine discuss the origins of laughter, what separates the amusing from the truly funny, and why even tragedy sometimes gets a laugh.

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