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Ahead Of Wildfire Season, Scientists Study What Fuels Fires

The federal fire scientists hope to hand off their findings to fire managers, who have to make the quick decisions on where to deploy resources that could protect lives and property.
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Former Commando Turns Conservationist To Save Elephants Of Dzanga Bai

Nir Kalron was once an Israeli commando, then private security consultant to African leaders, and a dealer of legal arms. Today he's working with African locals to hunt ivory poachers via satellite.
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How To Tell When A Laugh Is Real: The Answer Is In A Breath

Greg Bryant, a professor at UCLA, explains his studies on laughter. Using acoustic analysis, he found that real laughter was more emotional, closer to animals, and fake laughter was closer to speech.
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Anti-Aging Hormone Could Make You Smarter

Scientists have found that a hormone associated with long life also seems to make people smarter. The gene strengthens the connections between brain cells, a process that's essential for learning.
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Rice Theory: Why Eastern Cultures Are More Cooperative

Westerners tend to be more individualistic than Easterners. Did our ancestors plant these cultural differences hundreds of years ago when they chose which grains to grow?
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If Polar Bears Can Eat A Ton Of Fat And Be Healthy, Why Can't We?

Baby polar bears slurp milk that's 27 percent fat, and adults dine on seal blubber. Scientists think bears' adaptation to a high-fat diet might lead to better ways to treat human obesity.
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Study: Time Away Can Hurt Surgeons' Job Performance

Surgeons need rest days, weekends and vacations. But when they come back to work after a break, do they come back refreshed — or rusty?
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The Executioner's Lament

When things go wrong during an execution, the people responsible for carrying it out experience stressful, chaotic scenes. But even when the process goes right, it can take a lasting toll.
NPR

Less Nutritious Grains May Be In Our Future

When crops are surrounded by high levels of carbon dioxide, they're more productive. But they may have lower concentrations of some crucial nutrients, which could increase malnutrition in the future.
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Civil War Invades An Elephant Sanctuary: One Researcher's Escape

Andrea Turkalo spent 22 years in central Africa, studying rare forest elephants. Then civil war forced her to flee — and poachers killed many of the elephants she'd shared a life with.

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