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Driving While Pregnant Is Riskier Than You Might Think

Expectant mothers are more likely to get into serious car crashes, a study finds. The risk is highest in the second trimester, when accident rates are similar to those for people with sleep apnea.
NPR

Rocket Wars: Will A Suit By SpaceX Get Off The Ground?

The California-based maker of the Falcon 9 is hoping to break up a monopoly on the launch market for national security satellites.
NPR

Plenty Of Women Enter Academic Science. They Just Don't Stay

Women are underrepresented in the senior ranks of academic science, but they attend grad school in equal numbers as men. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to science correspondent Joe Palca about the disparity.
NPR

Did Homer Simpson Actually Solve Fermat's Last Theorem? Take A Look

Simon Singh spotted the equation on a Homer Simpson blackboard. Had Homer just solved one of the toughest puzzles in math? His solution, crazily, seemed "valid" – so Singh checked Homer's numbers.
NPR

Athletes Chased By Technology In The Sport Of Anti-Doping

As testing for doping in sports becomes more sophisticated, so do the drugs. Looking at the recent history of cycling can make you wonder how many cheaters continue to slip by undetected.
NPR

If It's Pricey, It Must Be Tastier, And Other Lies Our Brains Tell

Why do we prefer Coke over a generic cola? Psychologist Paul Bloom tells the TED Radio Hour's Guy Raz that we come to believe something is better because we're told that it is.
NPR

Keep Or Kill Last Lab Stocks Of Smallpox? Time To Decide, Says WHO

"If smallpox is outlawed, only outlaws will have smallpox," says one NIH virologist. Others say keeping vials of deadly virus just invites a horrific accident or theft. WHO is about to vote — again.
NPR

Ahead Of Wildfire Season, Scientists Study What Fuels Fires

The federal fire scientists hope to hand off their findings to fire managers, who have to make the quick decisions on where to deploy resources that could protect lives and property.
NPR

Former Commando Turns Conservationist To Save Elephants Of Dzanga Bai

Nir Kalron was once an Israeli commando, then private security consultant to African leaders, and a dealer of legal arms. Today he's working with African locals to hunt ivory poachers via satellite.
NPR

How To Tell When A Laugh Is Real: The Answer Is In A Breath

Greg Bryant, a professor at UCLA, explains his studies on laughter. Using acoustic analysis, he found that real laughter was more emotional, closer to animals, and fake laughter was closer to speech.

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