Science

RSS Feed
NPR

Drone It To Me, Baby

Drones are for spying, right? Right. But if Jasper van Loenen's idea works, drones will also become private moving vans. Crows won't like this. Trees won't like this. I'm not sure I like this. But you've got to see Jasper's instant-drone deliver a bicycle wheel across campus ...
NPR

Don't Call It A Mind-Meld: Human Brains Connect Via Internet

In what they call "direct brain-to-brain communication in humans," researchers at the University of Washington say they've successfully passed signals from one mind to another via the Internet, without using surgical implants.
NPR

Wise Old Whooping Cranes Keep Captive-Bred Fledglings On Track

A decade ago, cranes that had never before migrated followed the lead of an ultralight plane to learn the route south. Several generations later, old cranes are teaching young birds to navigate that same route. It's a clue that migration is a combination of nature and nurture, researchers say.
NPR

Antibiotic Use On The Farm: Are We Flying Blind?

No one knows exactly how farmers use antibiotics. Many public health experts say the government should collect and publish detailed information because antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasingly urgent problem. But many farm groups are opposed.
WAMU 88.5

NASA, Hubble & Outer Space: The Art Of Astronomy (Rebroadcast)

NASA's images and footage are used in everything from TV to movies, and they've inspired visual artists and musicians for decades. We explore how images of space are created and used in everything from scientific study to pop culture.

NPR

Another 'Grand Canyon' Discovered Beneath Greenland's Ice

Greenland is covered in an ice layer that's up to 2 miles thick. But below the ice, there's a vast terrain of bedrock. Now scientists have found a mega-canyon there, twice the size of the one in Arizona. The hidden canyon is drawing oohs and aahs from scientists around the world.
NPR

Some Rattlesnakes Losing Their Warning Rattle In S. Dakota

There are few things more chilling than the sound of a nearby rattlesnake. That distinctive sound serves as a warning that trouble could be on the way. The only thing worse than hearing a rattlesnake within striking distance — is not hearing it at all. A herpetologist in South Dakota's Black Hills has discovered a growing number of Prairie Rattlesnakes with atrophied tail muscles; he believes it's a genetic issue that multiplies because those snakes that can rattle usually end up being killed. But others think the situation could be an evolutionary development to avoid detection.
NPR

A Single Protein May Help Explain Memory Loss In Old Age

Age-related fumbles of memory are often feared as early signs of Alzheimer's dementia, but recent research confirms an important difference. The underlying biology of the two sorts of memory loss aren't the same. And the age-related form may be reversible someday.
NPR

How Money Worries Can Scramble Your Thinking

People are much worse at solving puzzles when they're first reminded of money problems, scientists say. Fretting about about finances can slow down your thinking as much as losing a night's sleep, researchers say.
WAMU 88.5

NIH Director Francis Collins

Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, joins Kojo in the studio.

Pages