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Great Salt Lake Is No 'Dead Sea'

Parts of Utah's Great Salt Lake are 10 times saltier than the ocean. But the lake is host to plenty of life, including salt-loving microbes that can turn the lake's water bubblegum pink. Bonnie Baxter, director of the Great Salt Lake, discusses how the bugs might hold the secrets to better sunscreen, hydrogen fuel cells--even life on Mars.
WAMU 88.5

Comfort Dogs

In the aftermath of recent tragedies, specially trained dogs have been sent to provide comfort. Diane and her guests discuss why canines are uniquely suited for the job.

NPR

Exploring Coffee's Past To Rescue Its Future

Today's commercial coffee production is based on only a tiny slice of the genetic varieties that have grown since prehistoric times. And that's a problem, because it leaves the world's coffee supply vulnerable to shocks like climate change, or the leaf rust currently ravaging Latin American coffee farms.
NPR

Can You Hear Me Now? Cellphone Satellites Phone Home

Never mind the big-budget NASA satellites. A team of young engineers has tricked out a few off-the-shelf cellphones and sent them to space. The smartphones are already above us, sending images and data back to ham radio operators on Earth.
NPR

Monkeys Also Want To Eat Like The Locals

When monkeys move to a new place, they want to eat what the locals are eating, a new study finds. It's among the first to see strong social behaviors in eating among wild animals.
NPR

Researchers Find Hormone That Grows Insulin-Producing Cells

When researchers turned on a gene for the hormone in the livers of diabetic lab mice, the number of insulin-making cells in their pancreas glands tripled within 10 days. Although the research was conducted in animals, the scientists say the findings could be relevant for humans.
NPR

Not Your Ordinary Science Fair

Today's young people might aim for the sky, but they might not envision a visit to the White House. Host Michel Martin talks with two students, Darius Hooker and Isabella Leighton, about their interest in rocket science and the White House Science Fair.
NPR

A Tale Of Mice And Medical Research, Wiped Out By A Superstorm

When Superstorm Sandy flooded lower Manhattan last year, thousands of lab animals drowned and many scientists lost months or even years of work. The specialty animals can be very difficult to replace, but researchers say the loss of animal life is emotionally devastating and difficult to get over.

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