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NPR

An Arbor Embolism? Why Trees Die In Drought

Scientists who study forests say they've discovered something disturbing about the way prolonged drought affects trees. When drought dries out the soil, a tree has to suck harder to draw in water. But that increases the risk of drawing in dangerous and deadly air bubbles.
NPR

'Erin Brockovitch' Town Faces New Threat

Pacific Gas & Electric Co. — blamed for the groundwater pollution case made famous in the movie -- is offering to buy homes in Hinkley, Calif., again, this time in areas previously believed to be unaffected by the contamination. Many families, some who have lived in the town for generations, are packing up.
NPR

When Fetuses Yawn In The Womb

Ultrasound often catches fetuses opening their mouths, but whether they're really yawning or not has been up for debate. Now, with some fancy ultrasound techniques, scientists have show that babies do indeed yawn in the womb.
NPR

Why Greek Yogurt Makers Want Whey To Go Away

That extra-thick, rich taste of Greek yogurt is popular, but you get it by creating lots of waste. For every pound of authentic strained Greek yogurt, there are 2 or 3 pounds of liquid whey. And getting rid of it can be expensive.
NPR

Coconut Conservationist Seeks Pacific Islands For Fun And Palm Preservation

Are the sources for your trendy coconut water and oil in danger? Not yet, says a French scientist, but he has an elaborate vision for how to overcome the coconut's biological challenges and ensure that the plant's dozens of varieties stick around for a long time.
NPR

Big News From Mars? Rover Scientists Mum For Now

Data from a soil sample on Mars have NASA scientists buzzing with excitement over a finding that could be "one for the history books." But they're not spilling the beans about their discovery just yet.
NPR

Could Nate Silver Predict How Good Your Pumpkin Pie Will Be?

Scientists have come up with an algorithm to guess how many stars a recipe will receive online. By building "social networks" for ingredients, the algorithms also reveal how we mix and match spices, make dishes more healthful and customize flavor profiles.

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