Science

RSS Feed
NPR

Telescope Targets Black Holes' Binges And Burps

Black holes grow by eating space dust and gas — and the material swallowed up emits high-energy X-rays. Later this week, NASA's newest space telescope will start searching the universe for signs of these mealtimes in hopes of unlocking some of the secrets of black holes.
NPR

Legal Battle Erupts Over Whose Plastic Consumers Should Trust

As BPA is phased out of some plastics, there are questions about the safety of other chemicals. A suit has been filed against Eastman, a company that makes a new BPA-free plastic called Tritan. Do other chemicals carry the same risks alleged for BPA?
NPR

What Does The Future Hold For Bird Flu Research?

Scientists gather in New York to consider the future of bird flu research after a moratorium on the work passes. Critics say the work and its findings could pose security risks, but scientists defend their experiments as preparation for outbreaks.
NPR

Ask An Astrophysicist

The universe is being pushed apart at a faster and faster rate. And the culprit? Dark energy. Astrophysicist Adam Riess shared the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics for that discovery, and now's your chance to ask him about it--or anything else you've been wondering about the cosmos.
NPR

Why Science Is A Non-Issue In The Election...Again

In the face of a massive drought and climbing sea levels are the presidential candidates going to talk about climate change? Why is science always at the bottom of the list of campaign issues that resonate with the public? Ira Flatow and guests discuss what scientists can do to shape the national dialogue in an election year.
NPR

Sally Ride, Pioneer

Almost 30 years ago, Sally Ride broke the NASA gender barrier and became America's first female astronaut. While aboard the Challenger shuttle Ride used a robotic arm she helped design, to deploy and receive a satellite. She died Monday of pancreatic cancer, at age 61.

Pages