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Should We Prohibit Genetically Engineered Babies?

What if, before your child was born, you could make sure they had the genes to be taller or smarter? Would that tempt you, or would you find it unnerving? Two teams of experts debate genetic engineering in the latest Intelligence Squared U.S. debate.
NPR

Does Having Children Make You Happier?

Academics have long believed that parenting is a driver of unhappiness, based in part on a 2004 study by Nobel prize-winning economist Danny Kahnemann. But a new study disagrees with that theory.
NPR

Pictures Don't Lie: Corn And Soybeans Are Conquering U.S. Grasslands

Farmers in the Dakotas, Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska converted 1.3 million acres of grassland into soybean and corn production between 2006 and 2011. Images derived from satellite data confirmed that changing landscape, which spells bad news wildlife and for soil integrity in some parts.
NPR

Forecasting Climate With A Chance Of Backlash

A surprising number of TV weather presenters are vocal deniers of climate change, while others fear audience backlash if they talk about such a polarizing topic. But one meteorologist in South Carolina is waging a climate education campaign, and says it's going over well.
NPR

Scientists Seek More Information On Meteorite

Authorities in Russia are still trying to figure out what happened to the meteorite that came crashing to earth on Friday. More than 1,000 people were injured. Renee Montagne talks to Andrew Kramer, a reporter with The New York Times about the response from residents and officials.
NPR

Protesters Call On Obama To Reject Keystone XL Pipeline

Tens of thousands of protesters turned out on the National Mall Sunday to encourage President Obama to make good on his commitment to act on climate change. The pipeline would carry tar sands oil from Alberta, Canada, to refineries on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico.
NPR

Growing Resistance, Oregon Hazelnuts Battle Blight

Carefully developed breeds are overpowering Eastern filbert blight, which had threatened to crush the U.S. hazelnut industry.
NPR

'Noble Savages': A Journey To Break The Mold Of Anthropology

In 1964, Napoleon Chagnon did what few other anthropologists had ever done: He went to the Amazon to study an isolated tribe. His findings cast him out from his profession as a heretic.

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