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Why College Freshmen May Feel Like Impostors On Campus

Psychologist Greg Walton has found that a simple intervention can help many students get the most out of college. The trick is in helping students see that setbacks are temporary, and often don't have larger implications.
NPR

Fuel In The Fire: Burn Wood For Power Or Leave It To Nature

The record-breaking wildfire in Yosemite National Park is calling attention to a problem found across the West: Forests are overloaded with fuel after a century of putting out fires. What to do about that is fueling its own heated debate.
NPR

Bioethicists Give Hollywood's Films A Reality Check

Bioethicists from Johns Hopkins talked shop with members of the film and television industry. Because a good story is an accurate story, the two groups discussed how to better portray moral medical issues on screen.
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How To See The Orionid Meteor Shower In The D.C. Area

NASA employees may be furloughed, but that doesn't stop the stars from twinkling. A meteor shower is slated for Sunday night — find out how best to  catch a glimpse.

NPR

18-Foot Oarfish Livens Up A 'Leisurely Snorkel' In California

A snorkeler off Catalina Island encountered a rare creature Sunday, when she saw the large eyes of an 18-foot fish staring back at her. It turned out to be a rare oarfish, known to live in waters thousands of feet deep.
NPR

Farm Families Pick Massive Corn Harvest As Prices Shrink

There's a lot of uncertainly in the air as harvest season gets into full swing across the Midwest. But this is a time of year when farm families come together to focus on the big task at hand.
NPR

Millions Of Miles From Shutdown, Mars Rovers Keep Working

The budget negotiations in Washington are not front-page news on Mars. There, millions of miles away, NASA's rovers continue to operate, taking photographs and collecting data as they prepare for the coming Martian winter.
NPR

Why Is Cheating In Science Research On The Rise?

The vast majority of researchers in the science field are honest and conscientious. But that's not the case for all of them, and a federal agency that tracks misconduct and cheating in the field is seeing increases.
NPR

Are Iran's Centrifuges Just Few Turns From A Nuclear Bomb?

Talks about the country's nuclear program are set to begin in Geneva. Iran says it is making nuclear fuel for power plants, but some observers are suspicious of the country's motives.
NPR

Trapped In A Fossil: Remnants Of A 46-Million-Year-Old Meal

Chemical compounds discovered in a mosquito fossil from Montana offer scientists clues to what the very old insect ate before it died. The bug's final blood meal was likely from a bird, researchers say, and could lead to other hints about ancient Earth.

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