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How Mouse Studies Lead Medical Research Down Dead Ends

New drugs are usually tested in animals before they're tested in humans. But many of those studies aren't done carefully enough, analysts say. So time and money is wasted, and treatments are delayed.
NPR

Play It Again And Again, Sam

We're all seduced by repetition, music research suggests — 90 percent of the music we listen to, we've heard before. Beyond music, this bias toward familiarity holds up in every culture. What gives?
NPR

The Future Of Clean, Green Fish Farming Could Be Indoor Factories

Aquaculture in the U.S. has lagged because of opposition from environmentalists and people living on the coast. But entrepreneurs say they've found a way to produce fish on land with little pollution.
NPR

Simple Blood Test To Spot Early Lung Cancer Getting Closer

Several scientific teams are developing sensitive tests for tumor DNA that, when perfected, could be used to diagnose cancer earlier, and more closely monitor the response to treatment.
NPR

An Astronaut Asks: What Does This Cloud Look Like?

The image comes from Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield, who gained fans last year when he tweeted photos and messages about his stint on the International Space Station.
NPR

Feds Hope $5 Billion Settlement A Lesson For Polluters

The Justice Department wants the settlement with mining company Kerr-McGee to send a powerful message: corporations can't shirk their responsibility to clean up the toxic legacies of their operations.
NPR

The Power Of Poop: A Whale Story

Whales are famous for spouts and blowholes. Turns out there's another whale opening that's just as important, but I'm too polite to mention it.
NPR

Could A 'Barbie' Get Real? What A Healthy Fashion Doll Looks Like

Barbie dolls are marketed with sports gear, but could they actually run on those spindly gams? The design for a doll based on an average 19-year-old's physique looks like it really has legs.
NPR

Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again

The vast majority of people, including soldiers, with PTSD, depression or other mental illness are not violent. Psychiatrists doubt the latest shooting at Fort Hood could have been predicted.
NPR

One More Speed Bump For Your Retirement Fund: Basic Human Impulse

Basic human impulses often conflict with saving for retirement. For one thing, people hate losing something — even more than we love winning. Behavioral economists call this "loss aversion."

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