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Cooking With Cicadas: No Weirder Than Eating Cheese?

We know, eating bugs sounds strange, but 2 billion people already do it — and the U.N. has made the case for insects as a key protein source. For U.S. East Coasters, the coming of the 17-year cicadas provides an opportunity to cook with bugs. If you want to try your hand at it, there's a cookbook to guide your way.
NPR

Scientists Discover Rip Van Winkle Of The Plant World

Nothing lives forever, but bryophytes come close. Scientists have found a kind of plant in the Canadian Arctic that started growing again after being buried under a glacier for 400 years.
NPR

Wal-Mart To Pay $81 Million For Hazardous Waste Dumping

The retail giant pleaded guilty to improperly disposing of toxic pollutants in California and Missouri in the period 2003 to 2005.
NPR

Why Do Whistle-Blowers Become Whistle-Blowers?

Management gurus have long preached the value of ethical leadership. In the presence of ethical leadership — but the absence of ethical co-workers — what happens to people's honesty?
NPR

The Business And Science Of Storm Shelters

There are no definitive numbers on how many people were saved by storm shelters in the deadly tornado in Moore, Okla. There's little doubt that those who sought cover in previously-installed underground shelters and safe rooms were protected. Still, most people in high-risk areas don't have them.
NPR

Beneath A Glacier's White, Researchers See Green

Underneath a receding glacier in the Canadian Arctic, researchers found something surprising: a kind of plant related to moss that was not only still green, but also growing.
NPR

Scientists Trace Source Of Famed Irish Potato Famine

We now know what caused the Irish potato famine. Scientists have pinpointed the pathogen by using plant samples collected in the mid-19th century. Weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden talks about it with the study's co-author, Sophien Kamoun of the Sainsbury Lab in the United Kingdom.
NPR

Ring Nebula Is More Like A Jelly Doughnut, NASA Says

The Ring Nebula, whose iconic shape and large size make it a favorite of amateur astronomers, can now be seen in new detail, after NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured a sharp image of the nebula. Researchers say the new clarity reveals details that were previously unseen, and a structure that's more complex than scientists believed.

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