Science

RSS Feed
NPR

Solar Toilet Disinfects Waste, Makes Hydrogen Fuel

The Reinvent the Toilet Challenge asked engineers to dream up a replacement for the antiquated flush toilet. Michael Hoffmann and his team at Caltech responded with a solar-powered toilet that disinfects waste and reuses wastewater to flush. Better yet, it pumps out hydrogen gas for use in fuel cells.
NPR

Aging City Pipes In Need Of A Plumber's Touch

A typical American family uses 400 gallons of water a day. But the pipes that ferry that water are bursting faster than they can be replaced. George Hawkins, general manager of DC Water, and environmental historian Martin Melosi discuss past and present issues with pumping water into cities.
NPR

Massive "Phoenix Cluster" Supersizes Star Creation

Writing in the journal Nature this week, astronomers say they've found a massive galaxy cluster that's pumping out stars at a record pace. Astronomer Michael McDonald describes the finding, and explains what might be causing the "Phoenix Cluster" to be in celestial overdrive.
NPR

Actress Danica McKellar Helps "Girls Get Curves"

In her newest book "Girls Get Curves: Geometry Take Shape" actress and math education advocate Danica McKellar teaches readers geometry, using her signature "girly" style. McKellar discusses the book, and tells why she chose to pair geometry lessons with tips for exercise and eating.
NPR

Arbiter Of 'Interestingness' Navigates The 'Net

Maria Popova, editor of brainpickings.org (and the über tweeter behind @brainpicker), describes herself as an "interestingness hunter-gatherer obsessed with combinatorial creativity." Popova discusses her work, and explains why she thinks the blogosphere needs a "curators' code."
NPR

For A Better, Leaner Burger, Get To Know Your Proteins

Americans love burgers, but cooking leaner meats on the grill requires some scientific know-how. We turn to Cooking for Engineers blogger Michael Chu for some technical tips for success with leaner meats.
NPR

Swarming Up A Storm: Why Animals School And Flock

By tricking live fish into attacking computer-generated "prey," scientists have learned that animals like birds and fish may indeed have evolved to swarm together to protect themselves from the threat of predators.

Pages