Science

RSS Feed
NPR

Welcome To The Nuclear Command Bunker

A small cadre of officers is responsible for keeping America's nukes on alert 24/7. Here's a peek into their world, and what it takes to do the job.
NPR

Fist Bumps Pass Along Fewer Germs Than Handshakes

That strong, sturdy handshake your grandpa taught you isn't the cleanest way to greet someone, scientists say. So should doctors and nurses in hospitals start bumping fists?
NPR

Widely Used Insecticides Are Leaching Into Midwest Rivers

Researchers found that a class of chemicals similar to nicotine and used on corn and soy farms has run off into streams and rivers in the Midwest. There they may be harming aquatic life, like insects.
NPR

On NASA's Birthday, Mars Rover Sets A Mileage Record

NASA's Opportunity Mars rover set a record Monday for driving a longer distance than any other manmade craft sent to another celestial body.
NPR

This Albino Redwood Tree Isn't Dead — But It Came Close

An extremely rare, albino hermaphroditic redwood tree was in danger of being sent to the chipper because it was growing too close to the path of a new railroad line in Cotati, Calif. But thanks to local outcry from arborists and the community, the tree is getting a second chance at life.
NPR

To Stop Cheating, Nuclear Officers Ditch The Grades

A switch to pass-fail grading is curbing the "perfection" culture among U.S. nuclear missile forces. Critics of the old way say striving to be perfect invited cheating by those who launch the nukes.
NPR

With Men's Y Chromosome, Size Really May Not Matter

The string of genes that make a man a man used to be much bigger, and some geneticists say it may be wasting away. Back off, others say. Y has been stable — and crucial — for millennia.
NPR

Where The Birds Are Is Not Where You'd Think

Birds are everywhere, but the greatest concentration of different birds — the "bird mecca" of America — is not in our great parks, not in our forests, not where you'd suppose. Not at all.
NPR

How Protecting Wildlife Helps Stop Child Labor And Slavery

Food in supermarkets is increasingly connected to child labor and trafficking. Many laws aimed at ending these abuses overlook a key source of the problem: The rapid decline of fish and fauna.
NPR

Rust Devastates Guatemala's Prime Coffee Crop And Its Farmers

Central American coffee farmers are facing off against a deadly fungus that has wiped out thousands of acres of crops. Coffee companies like Starbucks are pooling money to support them in the fight.

Pages