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Where Could Ebola Strike Next? Scientists Hunt Virus In Asia

A handful of ecologists knew for years that West Africa was at risk for an Ebola outbreak. Now they're figuring out where else in the world the virus could be hiding. Many signs point to Asia.
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These Froggies Went A Courtin' And Gave Birth To Live Tadpoles

Who needs eggs? Scientists have discovered an unusual frog species that gives birth to live tadpoles.
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Ebola Aid Workers Still Avoiding New York And New Jersey

It's been months since a nurse who treated Ebola patients in Africa was quarantined by New Jersey's governor upon arrival at Newark airport. But a legacy of confusion about state travel rules remains.
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Food Psychology: How To Trick Your Palate Into A Tastier Meal

Ingredients and preparation matter in making a delicious dinner. But so do a lot of other external factors, from your mood to room lighting. Here, a guide to enhancing the pleasures of the plate.
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Potent Powdered Caffeine Raises Safety Worries

With two young men dead, the Food and Drug Administration is considering banning sales to consumers of a highly concentrated form of pure caffeine. It's too easy to overdose, officials warn.
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2014 Brought Lasting Action On Climate Change Policy

The EPA moved ahead with far-reaching polices to reduce carbon pollution from power plants. And the president struck a landmark deal with China to curb its carbon output as well.
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Scientists Bring The Sun Down To Earth To Learn How It Works

Using a giant pulsed powered machine in New Mexico, researchers have recreated the conditions inside the Sun, and their results help reconcile theoretical models with how the Sun behaves.
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Tribute: The Man Who Linked Climate Change To Global Health

Dr. Tony McMichael was a lonely crusader. He wanted governments to pay attention to ways that earth's changing climate will affect the health of all — with the poor likely to suffer the most.
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Same-Sex Couples May Have More Egalitarian Relationships

Lourdes Garcia-Navarro talks to researcher Robert-Jay Green about how people behave in same-sex marriage compared with heterosexual marriage. Green has studied LGBT relationships going back to 1975.
NPR

Doctors Not Cutting Back On Radiation For Breast Cancer Patients

Breast cancer treatment typically involves surgery and chemotherapy, followed by radiation. But growing scientific evidence shows that in most cases, women get more radiation than they actually need.

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