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Grass: It's What's For Dinner (3.5 Million Years Ago)

If you want to go paleo in your diet, invest in a lawn mower. An examination of fossilized teeth from early humans and their ancient forebears reveals our ancestors switched from an ape diet of fruits and leaves to eating grasses and sedges about 3.5 million years ago.
NPR

No 'Universal' Best Practice To Save Yourself From Tornadoes

When you're caught in a tornado's path, should you run or hide? The tornado in Moore, Okla., and the storms that tore through the Oklahoma City area Friday provide contradictory answers.
NPR

Remapping Our Awareness Of Storm Surge Danger

As with Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy, nearly all deaths from hurricanes come from storm surge. The danger isn't well understood by the public, however, so the National Hurricane Center is retooling its forecast and warning systems to better track and alert vulnerable residents.
NPR

After Years Of War, Ugandan Children Face New Deadly Threat

Uganda has lost one generation to a brutal, decades-long war. Now, a second generation is jeopardized by a strange disease known as nodding syndrome, which affects only children in parts of Africa and has no known cause.
NPR

Gizmo Uses Lung Cells To Sniff Out Health Hazards In Urban Air

A retired professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, has developed a sensor that goes beyond the usual chemical monitor. This portable device checks the air for smog components that hurt human health.
NPR

The SciFri Book Club Takes a Hike

The book club regulars gather to chat about the best-sellingA Walk in the Woods, writer Bill Bryson's 1998 account of a hiking trip along the Appalachian Trail. Plus, journalist Deborah Blum joins the club to talk about the best science books to stash in your beach bag (or backpack).
NPR

Huge Asteroid Makes Its Closest Pass To Earth Today

The space rock, which is nine times the size of a cruise ship, is dropping by Earth and it's not coming alone. Asteroid 1998 QE2 has already given scientists a surprise: It has its own moon, measured at about 2,000 feet wide.
NPR

Houston's Petrochemical Industry, Source Of Jobs And Smog

Houston's air quality improved dramatically over the past decade, but the city is still short of meeting the latest smog standards. Getting there isn't simply a matter of cracking down more on the petrochemical industry — the city needs to deal with cars on its sprawling roads, and bad air blowing from out of town.

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