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From One Man's Damaged Brain, A Treasure Trove Of Research On Memory

When Kent Cochrane survived a motorcycle accident in 1981, he emerged with types of amnesia so rare that his brain became one of the most studied in history. He died this year at 62.
NPR

An Aspiring Martian Continues To Pursue The Red Planet

Heidi Beemer has dreamed of going to Mars since she was 8 years old. In January, NPR talked to her about her application to Mars One, which is still pending — now she explains she has a plan B, too.
NPR

Dwarf Galaxy, Long Overlooked, Discovered In Our 'Hood

Tiny Kks3, 7 million light years distant, is made up mostly of star stuff that's just a billion or so years younger than the Big Bang.
NPR

Military Policy Impedes Research On Traumatic Brain Injuries

The U.S. military set up a bank to collect brain tissue samples to better understand battlefield brain injury. But a law that prevents tissue donations from U.S. troops has severely hampered efforts.
NPR

One More Reason To Reach For A Paper Book Before Bed

Using an E-Reader before trying to nod off may disrupt sleep more than reading a paper book, a study suggests. Scientists suspect the screen's blue light is messing with a sleep-inducing hormone.
NPR

Recordings That Made Waves: The Songs That Saved The Whales

In the mid-1960s, a biologist discovered the beauty of humpback whale songs. But his recordings weren't just academic — they were woven into popular music, and they kicked off an entire movement.
NPR

Want To Solve The World's Most Heated Disagreements? Bring Your Wallet

Research found that a little cash goes a long way toward making people more thoughtful about what motivates their longtime foes, be it Israelis and Palestinians or Republicans and Democrats.
NPR

Do Fish Have Fingers?

Of course they don't, but they do have the genetic machinery to make fingers — something that shows how similar fish are to modern mammals.
NPR

Solving The Mystery Of Why Rock Ants Avoid Right Turns

Ants that live in a rocky maze-like setting prefer to turn left when they enter a space. Ants aren't as symmetrical as they appear. Their left eye may be better than the right for detecting predators.
NPR

Unexpected Life Found In The Ocean's Deepest Trench

An expedition to the Pacific's Mariana Trench has found evidence that life exists miles below the surface. But it's not life as we know it.

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