Science

RSS Feed
NPR

Trapped In A Fossil: Remnants Of A 46-Million-Year-Old Meal

Chemical compounds discovered in a mosquito fossil from Montana offer scientists clues to what the very old insect ate before it died. The bug's final blood meal was likely from a bird, researchers say, and could lead to other hints about ancient Earth.
NPR

Birds Of A Feather Spy Together

Journalist Tom Vanderbilt discusses the nonhuman operatives — from pigeons to house cats — deployed by the United States government during the Cold War. He wrote about the program recently for the Smithsonian magazine.
NPR

Bill Nye Returns To Science Entertainment

Bill Nye, who gained a cult following as the Science Guy, has a new web series, a collaboration with NASA Why with Nye. He joins host Rachel Martin to talk about the new series.
NPR

The New And The Next: Six-Second Comedy And A Spin On News

This week, Ozy co-founder Carlos Watson tells NPR's Arun Rath about the latest trend in Uruguay's YouTube scene and one young woman who gained a following with her love of science.
NPR

Shutdown's Reach Extends To South Pole

Research season was just getting started when the government shutdown put McMurdo Station into "caretaker" mode, halting data collection. Host Scott Simon speaks to Gretchen Hofmann, a professor at University of California, Santa Barbara, about the government shutdown's impact on research in Antarctica.
NPR

Shutdown Leaves Some Seniors Worried About Their Next Meal

Some Michigan seniors may be going hungry thanks to the government shutdown. In western Kent County alone, more than 1,300 low-income seniors depend on a government surplus food program. But the USDA has announced that the program is hold until further notice.
NPR

Why A Peanut Butter Test For Alzheimer's Might Be Too Simple

Researchers at the University of Florida are suggesting that the smell test could determine whether someone is in the early stages of Alzheimer's. But the discovery comes with caveats and lots of skepticism about how useful a test it would really be.
WAMU 88.5

Bluff, Bluster And Negotiation: Solving Political Stalemates

Recent negotiations between congressional Republicans and Democrats can look like a reckless game of chicken, with both parties speeding toward a cliff and neither willing to give in. But as the deadline for Congress to raise the nation's debt ceiling draws closer, the two parties are signaling that they're willing to find a solution to the stalemate that has shutdown the Capitol. Kojo explores the science and strategy behind high-stakes negotiations and asks whether it is possible for a highly polarized Congress to find common ground.

NPR

Drinking With Your Eyes: How Wine Labels Trick Us Into Buying

There's a whole slew of mind games that label designers use to get us to think better of their wines without ever tasting a sip. Want to add 10 bucks to the price of a bottle? Class it up with some gold stamping on that label. An insider spills the industry's secrets in a gorgeous photo book.
NPR

What Humans Can Learn From A Simple Kiss

Why is kissing found in practically every culture? A kiss can convey passion, love and, perhaps subconsciously, a veritable catalog of information about the worthiness of a potential mate. So much for romance.

Pages