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The Science Behind Hard Hits And Touchdowns

Fans love to watch the drama on the football field. But scientists are watching the action in a different way. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with material scientist Ainissa Ramierez and journalist Allen St. John about their new book "Newton's Football: The Science Behind America's Game."
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Insomnia Could Raise Risk Of Heart Disease And Death In Men

Missing out on good quality sleep has emerged as a real medical issue. Now Harvard researchers say men who had trouble falling asleep were more likely to die prematurely than men who said they could doze off easily. There's no proof sleeplessness caused an increase in mortality, but the association was strong.
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VIDEO: Spectacular Animation Of Biggest Bang Ever Seen

A gamma-ray burst observed by orbiting telescopes this year was "a once-in-a-century cosmic event," says a NASA astrophysicist. Now the space agency has produced an animated video to show what it looked like.
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'Ghost Particles' In Antarctica Offer Glimpse Of Deep Space

By putting light sensors inside a giant ice cube that's a mile beneath the South Pole, scientists detected 28 neutrinos from beyond the solar system. It's just a start – but researchers hope the work could eventually yield a way to see through debris clouds to the core of exploding stars.
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Reinventing The Condom With Easy-On Tabs And Beef Tendon

What would it take for people to like using condoms? Inventors say it's all about the fit and feel. The 11 winners in a competition sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation include one condom made from beef tendons, and another that's heat-activated for a glove-like fit.
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Walking The World: 7 Years And Counting

Paul Salopek is on a seven year trek, literally walking around the world - and he's posting photos, videos, and comments about his journey online. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with Salopek, and education advisor Homa Tavangar, about the different things kids can learn by seeing the world through Paul's eyes.
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Remember 'French Fries Cause Cancer'? Here's The Acrylamide Update

Back in 2002, news that acrylamide, a carcinogen in animals, had been found in some foods set off a bit of a panic. Now the FDA has issued a new warning on the chemical in food. But here's the puzzler: In the years since that first scare, the human studies haven't really backed those initial concerns about cancer.
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Organic Farmers Bash FDA Restrictions On Manure Use

Many organic farmers are hopping mad right now at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Their reason? Fertilizer. The FDA, as part of its overhaul of food safety regulations, wants to limit the use of animal manure, which organic farmers call a precious resource and a basis of their farming practices.
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At Climate Meeting, Tensions Rise Between Rich And Poor Nations

At the United Nations climate talks in Warsaw, Poland, conflict between rich and poor nations is mounting. The developing world wants large sums of money to help them adapt to climate change. The U.S. and Europe say they're doing what they can to help but times are tough.
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Poor Countries Push Rich Nations To Do More On Climate Change

Delegates to the U.N. climate change conference in Poland from many of the world's poorer nations are asking wealthier countries to pay compensation to the impoverished countries bearing the brunt of climate change. Melissa Block talks to Munjurul Hannan Khan, negotiator and spokesman for the Least Developed Countries Group about the tensions between rich and poor countries.

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