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Loophole Lets Toxic Oil Water Flow Over Indian Land

Every month, oil and gas operations dump millions of gallons of wastewater on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. Under a long-standing EPA loophole, it's perfectly legal. Internal agency documents obtained by NPR show the water contains toxic chemicals, including known carcinogens and radioactive materials, that end up in natural rivers.
NPR

A Peek Inside Rappers' Brains Shows Roots Of Improvisation

Scientists have found rappers and jazz musicians use their brains in similar ways when it comes to improvisation. Brain scans show distinct differences in which parts of the brain are most active during rap performances of memorized pieces compared with those that are done freestyle.
NPR

Raise A Toast To Building Better Beer Bubbles Through Chemistry

Spanish scientists have identified the specific gene in yeast that's responsible for the foamy head on your glass beer. And that discovery could lead to what we've all been wishing for — more long-lasting foam on top of our ales of the future.
NPR

A 'Green' Gold Rush? Calif. Firm Turns Trash To Gas

California starts the ball rolling Wednesday on a controversial scheme to keep the planet from overheating: Businesses will have to get a permit if they emit greenhouse gases. And one California company is hoping to get in on the ground level, by turning trash into biomass energy.
NPR

Study: Reading 'Maxim' Can Make You A Theft Target

Criminologists in Texas find that you are more likely to become a victim of theft if your behavior somehow marks you as being "outside the mainstream." One sign of such behavior: leaving copies of racy magazines and crushed beer cans in your car.
NPR

Calif. To Begin Rationing Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Starting Wednesday, the state begins America's most ambitious effort to control climate change: Big companies must limit the greenhouse gases they release — from smokestacks to tailpipes — and get permits for those emissions.
NPR

Adventurous Eating Helped Human Ancestors Boost Odds Of Survival

The discovery of new foods by chefs of the prehistoric age may have helped our human ancestors evolve, archeologists say. Hominins that lived about 3 million years ago began eating grasses and sedge, which helped them survive in different environments.
NPR

Death, But Softly

The world's first essayist, Michel Montaigne, was out riding one day when he got slammed from the rear, was thrown from his horse, crashed to the ground and for a brief time was, as he puts it, "dead." He described exactly what it felt like. Here's what he learned.

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