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How To Clean Up Fish Farms And Raise More Seafood At The Same Time

Coastal fish farms are a major source of the seafood we eat, but all the fish waste they generate takes a toll on the environment. So a researcher in Canada is trying to clean up fish farms by creating an ecosystem where fish waste gets taken up by other valuable seafood commodities, like shellfish and kelp.
NPR

Feeling A Little Blue May Mask Our Ability To Taste Fat

Temporary, strong emotions, when we're already feeling down, can significantly reduce our ability to perceive the fat in our food, researchers say. It's the latest finding to show how strong emotions can confuse our sense of taste.
NPR

How Nature Builds A Pandemic Flu Virus

A type of bird flu that appeared in China a few months ago has infected more than a hundred people. Some scientists are worried that this virus has the potential spread globally. But a look at the virus's genes suggests the pathogen doesn't have the typical features of pandemic.
NPR

NIH Chief Rejects Ethics Critique Of Preemie Study

At issue is a controversial study of more than 1,300 severely premature infants that looked at how much oxygen they should receive after birth. This spring, the federal Office for Human Research Protections criticized the scientists who ran the study for failing to tell parents enough about the risks.
NPR

Navy Studies Cicadas For Their Amplifying Sound Technique

From southern Virginia to New England, lots of people are being treated to a cicada serenade. If these insects sound loud to you, that's because they are. They're so loud that some Navy engineers are trying to borrow their technique.
NPR

Vilsack: Farmers Must Respond To Rising Temperatures

Farmers, foresters, and ranchers need to respond now to the impact of climate change on their businesses, says Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. "You're going to see crops produced in one area no longer able to be produced, unless we mitigate and adapt now," he says.
NPR

Tiny, Ancient Tree-Dweller Was One Of Earth's Earliest Primates

About 55 million years ago, a teacup-sized critter in China was helping to pave the way for apes and humans. This insect eater had fingernails and stereo vision, a newly published analysis of a fossil suggests. And it weighed just 1 ounce.
WAMU 88.5

The Smithsonian Explores Navigation

A new exhibit at the Smithsonian Institution examines the history and future of navigation, from following the North Star at sea to following the GPS in your cell phone.

WAMU 88.5

Try No. 2 For NASA Rocket From Wallops

After scrubbing the rocket launch from Wallops Island, Va., Tuesday night, NASA says they will try again Wednesday, and the launch should be visible across the region.

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