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Close Shave: Asteroid To Buzz Earth Next Week

At its closest approach, the office building-sized asteroid will be only about 17,200 miles above the surface of our planet. That's far nearer to us than the moon, and even closer than some weather and communications satellites. Some people think this near miss should serve as a wake-up call.
NPR

Fresh Clues In Dinosaur Whodunit Point To Asteroid

What killed the dinosaurs? It's history's ultimate murder mystery, and for decades the prime suspect has been a giant asteroid. New data suggest that it struck right before the extinction. But scientists say it still may not tell the full story of what happened to the dinosaurs.
WAMU 88.5

Inside Addiction Treatment

People with drug and alcohol addictions often enter a rehabilitation for treatment. A panel joins Diane to discuss what works and what does not.

NPR

Silica Rule Changes Delayed While Workers Face Health Risks

Regulations to restrict the amount of silica dust that workers can inhale was set decades ago, and workplace safety experts say that limit needs to be cut in half. A proposal for new rules was sent to the White House Office of Management and Budget for a 90-day review, but almost two years later, it's still under review.
NPR

Debate Rages On Even As Research Ban On Gun Violence Ends

President Obama has ordered an end to a 16-year-old ban on federal funding of research on guns and health. But the political controversy that led to the ban in the first place continues to rage on.
NPR

Stone Age Stew? Soup Making May Be Older Than We'd Thought

There's nothing better on a cold day than a warm bowl of soup. But when did our ancestors first brew up this tasty broth? New archaeological evidence suggests that soup making could be tens of thousands of years old.
WAMU 88.5

The Up And Downside Of Fear

Fear prompts a reaction that can be a literal lifesaver in the face of real danger, but that hinders the millions who struggle with anxiety disorders. We learn more about our most primal emotion.

NPR

Why You Love That Ikea Table, Even If It's Crooked

Building your own stuff boosts your feelings of pride and competence, and also signals to others that you are competent. As a result, most of us believe we labor on things we love. Now, psychologists are asking if it is the other way around — is it labor that leads to love?

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