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Coal Loses Crown As King Of Power Generation

A Georgia utility's announcement that it will shutter coal-powered generators in the coming years is part of a national trend of shifting to natural gas. One key factor is low gas prices, fueled by a boom in shale gas production.
NPR

After Accidents, U.S. To Review Shell's Drilling In Arctic Ocean

Melissa Block talks with science correspondent Richard Harris about Shell's troubled history in the Arctic.
NPR

In The Battle Between Health And Taste, Why White Bread Still Wins

We know we need to eat more whole grains like whole-wheat bread, but white bread crust gives off chemicals that smell better to most of us. To combat this, manufacturers add sugar to whole-wheat foods, but this can make them less healthy.
NPR

How E-Waste Is Becoming a Big, Global Problem

According to the EPA, more than 2.5 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, is produced each year in the U.S. Derek Markham, a contributing writer for Treehugger.com, discusses the global impacts, and why you should think twice before discarding your old cell phone.
NPR

Getting A Handle On Why Fingers Wrinkle

Why do your fingers get pruney after a long water bath? Only a handful of researchers (ever) have looked into the finger-wrinkling experience. Reporting in the journal Biology Letters, researchers make the case for finger wrinkles as treads — wet wrinkled fingers seem to grip better than wet smooth ones.
NPR

Pap Test May Detect More Than Just Cervical Cancer

Pap tests, which are routinely used to detect cervical cancer, may be capable of spotting ovarian and uterine cancers as well, according to a new paper published in Science Translational Medicine. Study co-author Luis Diaz, of Johns Hopkins, discusses the findings.
NPR

The Fallacies Of Fat

In his new book Fat Chance: Beating the Odds Against Sugar, Processed Food, Obesity, and Disease, endocrinologist and obesity doc Robert Lustig deconstructs the mythology of fat. He says exercise, for all its benefits, won't help you shed pounds--and that fasting only worsens weight gain.
NPR

Using Genetics to Target Cancer's Achilles' Heel

To develop more effective treatments for cancer, doctors are zeroing in on the disease's genetic drivers. John DiPersio, chief of oncology at Washington University Medical Center, and Merck's Gary Gilliland discuss how this may revolutionize the future of cancer treatment.
NPR

Simulating The Red Planet, On The Pale Blue Dot

What's it like to live--and cook--on Mars? To find out, researchers are simulating Mars missions in Russia, and on the slopes of a Hawaiian volcano. Kim Binsted talks about her study to whip up tastier space food. Porcini mushroom risotto, anyone? And sleep expert Charles Czeisler talks about how humans adapt to the 24.65-hour Martian day.

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