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Environmental Outlook: Stink Bugs

The brown marmorated stink bug tops the USDA's list of most invasive insects. Since arriving on the East Coast aboard a ship from Asia, they've spread to 40 states and threaten billions of dollars in crops. In this month's Environmental Outlook, we look at the biology and ecology of stink bugs and efforts to control their invasion.

WAMU 88.5

Climate Change In Our National Parks (Rebroadcast)

The director of the National Park Service joins Kojo to talk about its stewardship mission and what lies ahead for the nation's natural treasures.

NPR

Of Flybots And Bug Eyes: Insects Inspire Inventors

Miniaturizing technology is really hard — gears, rotors, belts and pistons that work perfectly at human size just don't work very well at the small scale. So researchers are turning to insects for ideas about how to make tiny flying robots and cameras — and driving a new generation of gadgets.
NPR

Can Salmon Farming Be Sustainable? Maybe, If You Head Inland

For years, salmon farming has gotten a bad rap from marine biologists, who say the fish grown in open-ocean net pens generate pollution, disease and parasites. But now, a few salmon farms have moved on land. From an environmental standpoint, some scientists say, that's "a huge step forward."
NPR

Send Your Haiku To Mars! NASA Seeks Poets

NASA is looking for three haikus to include on a DVD that will travel to Mars aboard a spacecraft this fall. And everyone who submits a poem will have their name included.
NPR

Who Paid For Last Summer's Drought? You Did

Corn and soybean farmers not only survived last year's epic drought — thanks to crop insurance, they made bigger profits than they would have in a normal year, a new analysis finds. And a big chunk of those profits were provided through taxpayer subsidies.
NPR

Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

The winter of 1609-1610 has been called the "starving time" for the hundreds of men and women who settled the English colony of Jamestown, Va. They ate their horses, their pets — and, apparently, at least one person. Scientists say human bones recovered from the site provide the first hard evidence that the colonists may have resorted to cannibalism.
WAMU 88.5

A Frontline Fighter In Pediatric HIV

Kojo talks with Johns Hopkins pediatric virologist Dr. Deborah Persaud about her career and the research that led to the first "functional cure" of an HIV-infected baby.

NPR

A Sleep Gene Has A Surprising Role In Migraines

Disruptions of sleep are well known as migraine triggers, but now researchers have found a genetic link between the two. In studying families with lots of migraines, they also found a mutation on a gene that helps control circadian rhythms.

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