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A Shadow Economy Lurks In An Electronics Graveyard

Two decades ago, the region of Agbogbloshie in Ghana was a lush mangrove swamp. Now, reporter and photographer Yepoka Yeebo explains, it's a vast dump full of electronic waste and young scavengers.
NPR

Researchers Enlist Internet Users To Help Monitor Penguins

Penguin Watch lets people around the world further science by looking at images of the adorable birds in the wild. Researcher Caitlin Black tells NPR's Rachel Martin how you can help from your chair.
NPR

Faith And Aquarium Pumps: The Stuff Of Science In 2014

It may seem scientists are aloof geniuses who churn out discoveries. Joe Palca's NPR series, Joe's Big Idea, shows us how science really works. He reviews 2014 highlights with NPR's Rachel Martin.
NPR

Despite Last Year's Failures, Many Still Make Resolutions

Did you make a New Year's resolution? If you did, our data expert Mona Chalabi says you're in the 44 percent of Americans who did. She tells NPR's Rachel Martin that keeping to them is another story.
NPR

Trading Pom-Poms For Field Boots: Mireya Mayor's Big Break

The explorer's life plays out like an adventure film. But before she ever went diving with great whites, she was cheering for the Miami Dolphins — until a required science course changed her plans.
NPR

Orca Calf Shows Signs Of Whale Midwifery

A whale researcher has a new hypothesis about orca whales: Whale "midwives" may be assisting births.
NPR

Utilities Fight For Revenue Lost To Solar Power

Solar energy had a banner year in 2014, but as more U.S. households make their own electricity, they're paying electric utilities less. Utility companies across the nation are fighting back.
NPR

NASA Hopes A Hack Will Overcome Mars Rover's Memory Gap

The Mars rover Opportunity is getting on in years. It has been on Mars' surface for over a decade, and now it's having memory problems. NASA has come up with a plan to fix it.
NPR

Our Most Popular Stories Of 2014: Ebola ... And Bed Rails?

In July, the Goats and Soda blog was born. We came into a world obsessed with Ebola. But our readers also loved stories about chocolate, bed rails and jet-setting viruses.
NPR

Researchers Create Artificial Organs On Microchips

Scientists are growing mock organs made of human cells to better study diseases and help test drugs. Researchers at Johns Hopkins are working on a gut-on-a-chip.

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