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Why Your Brain Wants To Help One Child In Need — But Not Millions

Donations to fight Ebola are lower than expected. One psychologist thinks the reason may be the impact of hopelessness. A really big problem makes people less likely to give.
NPR

Researchers Tap Web Chatter To Figure Out Who's Sick

With the help of online data, doctors and public health officials are tracking the spread of illnesses and predicting where they might strike next. The analyses also provide clues for prevention.
NPR

Let's Clear This Up — In New York City, There's Only 1 Rat For Every 4 People

Audie Cornish speaks with Jonathan Auerbach, a PhD student in statistics at Columbia University who endeavored to get a better estimate of the New York City rat population.
NPR

Falling Oil Prices Make Fracking Less Lucrative

As oil prices dip, controversial and relatively expensive production methods, like oil sands and fracking, have become less profitable. Some drillers are already cutting back on plans for more wells.
NPR

Invasive Bug Prompts Quarantine In Pennsylvania Townships

The spotted lanternfly has officially arrived in the U.S., and leaders in Pennsylvania are hoping it won't be staying long.
NPR

Incorrect Command May Have Doomed Virgin Spaceship

On Friday, an experimental space plane crashed in the Mojave desert, killing one of its pilots. Now new details have emerged about what went wrong in the moments before the crash.
NPR

On The Trail To Preserve Appalachia's Bounty Of Heirloom Crops

With some 1,500 heirloom fruits and vegetables under cultivation, Appalachia is the most diverse foodshed in the U.S., Canada and northern Mexico. Among them is a beloved corn called Bloody Butcher.
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A Non-GMO Way To Get More, Tastier Tomatoes

Farmers want tomato varieties that yield more fruit. Consumers want tastier ones. How to resolve that tension? A new genetic toolkit could help growers maximize the best of both worlds.
NPR

U.N. Report Warns Of 'Irreversible' Damage To Earth's Climate

In Copenhagen on Sunday, scientists gathered to issue their latest assessment of the world's climate. Their report is considered the most comprehensive overview of the state of climate science.
NPR

New Clock May End Time As We Know It

Scientists working to create the perfect atomic clock have a fundamental problem: Right now, on the ceiling, time is passing just a bit faster than it is on the floor.

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