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Birds Of A Feather Aren't Necessarily Related

Geneticists have revised the evolutionary tree of birds, revealing some unlikely relationships.
NPR

Kalettes, Broccoflower And Other Eye-Popping Vegetables For 2015

Kale's days as the superfood-du-jour may be numbered. Next up: Kalettes? It's a cross between kale and Brussels sprouts, and it's one of a few bewitching hybrid vegetables that could go big in 2015.
NPR

Football Players Drill Without Helmets To Curb Concussions

The idea, according to a scientist at New Hampshire University, is to teach each player "rugby awareness," so he'll be more likely to keep his head out of harm's way. Helmets off, eyes up.
NPR

Why The White House Wants To Go After Seafood Pirates

Americans eat more seafood than just about anyone, but a big portion of imports are caught illegally. One expert calls this "the single greatest threat to sustainable fisheries in the world today."
NPR

Unexpected Joint Pain Seen In Test Of Experimental Ebola Vaccine

A major donor has pledged $300 million to distribute an Ebola vaccine in Africa, as soon as one is available. Vaccine development is proceeding, but there have been hiccups.
NPR

Debunking Vaccine Myths Can Have An Unintended Effect

People concerned about potential flu vaccine side effects may be less likely to get the shot after learning that their worries are more misplaced than they were to start with.
NPR

What Is Torture? Our Beliefs Depend In Part On Who's Doing It.

Researchers are studying how nations and individuals react when they given information that members of their own group have harmed other people, such as through torture. It takes some nimble thinking.
NPR

Debate: Should We Genetically Modify Food?

Many crops we eat today are the product of genetic modifications that happen in a lab, not in nature. Scientists and consumers are divided how cautious we need to be about these foods.
NPR

A Crowd Of Scientists Finds A Better Way To Predict Seizures

The winners of an online competition identified electrical patterns in the brain that often precede a seizure. The victors included a mathematician and an engineer, but no doctor.
NPR

Scientists Often Skip A Simple Test That Could Verify Their Work

Scientists have published thousands of studies using immortal cell lines, but in many cases the cells in the experiments have been misidentified or contaminated. The problem could be avoided easily.

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