Science | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

Science

RSS Feed
NPR

Benjamin Franklin's Intellectual Revolution

Benjamin Franklin's entrepreneurial spirit fueled American innovation during his time and can still be felt today. In The Society for Useful Knowledge author Jonathan Lyons talk about how Franklin brought an intellectual revolution through practical invention, collaborative inquiry, and shared knowledge.
NPR

Farming Got Hip In Iran Some 12,000 Years Ago, Ancient Seeds Reveal

Archaeologists had considered Iran unimportant in the history of farming – until now. Ancient seeds and farming tools uncovered in Iran reveal Stone Age people there were growing lentils, barley and other crops. The findings offer a snapshot of a time when humans first started experimenting with farming.
NPR

Exploding The Mystery Of Blue Fireworks

Audie Cornish speaks with John Conkling, technical director of the American Pyrotechnics Association, about why it's so difficult to achieve the color blue in fireworks.
NPR

Scientists Grow A Simple, Human Liver In A Petri Dish

The tiny organs created from stem cells aren't complete, but they act like regular livers when transplanted into mice, Japanese scientists say. Still, it will be years before the synthetic organs could help people with liver problems, even if further research all works out as hoped.
NPR

Why You Can't Name New Moons And Planets Anything You Want

Pluto's two newest moons received their official names this week, and the name that led in the popular vote was Spock's home planet, Vulcan. But it was rejected by the international team of astronomers who must approve every title bestowed upon the universe.
NPR

Film Rankles Environmentalists By Advocating Nuclear Power

A new documentary argues that environmentalists should favor nuclear power, not oppose it, on the grounds that the world's growing appetite for energy can't be met solely with wind and solar. Pandora's Promise is in theaters now, and not winning friends in the mainstream environmental movement.
NPR

In Israel, Unearthing A Bed Of Flowers For Eternal Rest

An archaeological dig at Mount Carmel in Israel has turned up what may be the oldest evidence of humans using flowers when burying their dead. By about 12,000 years ago, researchers have found, some dead would have been buried in a flower-lined grave in a small cemetery.
NPR

15-Ton Particle Ring Travels To Chicago By Land And By Sea

A lab in Chicago can produce particles called muons, but it needs an electromagnetic ring on Long Island to produce them. Since the 50-foot ring can't be taken apart or flown over houses, movers drove it to the shoreline and will sail it down the East Coast on a sea barge and up rivers to the Windy City.
NPR

NASA Has Shut Down Space Telescope Orbiting Earth

Since its launch in 2003, GALEX photographed nebulae and spiral galaxies, and "used its ultraviolet vision to study hundreds of millions of galaxies across 10 billion years of cosmic time," NASA says.
NPR

Baikonour, We Have A Problem. Russian Rocket Crashes And Burns

A massive Proton-M rocket carrying three Russian navigation satellites veered off course shortly after liftoff.

Pages