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Mental Health Cops Help Reweave Social Safety Net In San Antonio

Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
NPR

Experimental Vaccine For Chikungunya Passes First Test

Using a new technology, scientists have created a vaccine for an emerging mosquito-borne virus. The vaccine was safe and produced some degree of immunity in a preliminary study.
NPR

Often On The Move, Restless Elephants Are Tough To Count — And Keep Safe

A recent study tried to pin down just how many elephants have been killed by poachers. It's a lot — enough to eventually eliminate the species — but pinning down an exact death toll is difficult. The reason elephants are so hard to protect is the same that makes them so hard to count: They roam — exceptionally far.
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At The Nano Level, Wrinkles Aren't Always A No-No

What happens when you add folds to materials that are only a few atoms thick? Several scientists set out to find the answer — and discovered that these nano-wrinkles can be quite useful.
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Seeking Proof For Why We Feel Terrible After Too Many Drinks

Author Adam Rogers says there are lots of myths about what causes hangovers. His new book, Proof: The Science of Booze, explores these and other scientific mysteries of alcohol's effect on the body.
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Elephant Slaughter, African Slavery And America's Pianos

Two New England towns dominated the world's ivory market from 1840 to 1940 — transforming imported tusks from African elephants into piano keys and combs. Today's residents grapple with a dark past.
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How Does Winning Math's Fields Medal Affect Productivity?

An analysis by two economists finds that winners of the medal, the most significant prize in mathematics, become significantly less productive in their chosen field of study after they win the prize.
NPR

New Cameras Will Map Florida's Reefs

A scientific survey of coral reefs off the Florida keys is being done using the same fish-eye camera lenses that Google uses to capture street views. Scientists will use the images for research.
NPR

Cold Winter Depleted Some Coastal Fish Populations

The extreme cold weather on the East Coast last winter has meant that some fishermen have smaller catches this summer. NPR's Linda Wertheimer talks to fishing forecaster Mitchell Roffer in Florida.
NPR

Fighting (Tasty) Invasive Fish With Forks And Knives

Invasive fish like snakeheads and Asian carp are threatening to wipe out aquatic ecosystems across the U.S. So chefs and environmental agencies are encouraging their communities to eat them up.

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