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Is Climate Change Responsible For Sandy?

To what extent was climate change behind the formation of the superstorm Sandy? Did it make the storm worse than it otherwise would have been? Robert Siegel puts these questions to Martin Hoerling, research meteorologist at NOAA's Earth Systems Laboratory.
NPR

High-Def Storm Models Yielded Accurate Predictions

Hurricane forecasters predicted that Sandy would be an odd storm, and they were right. It turned left when most hurricanes turn right, it maintained its strength even as it struck land, and it joined forces with a winter storm. The computer models that characterized the storm's behavior are much more accurate and faster than they used to be.
NPR

Finding New Tricks To Get More Satisfaction Out Of Low-Fat Foods

While both thickness and creaminess sensations contribute to our eating satisfaction, thick foods keep us from feeling hungry longer, researchers say. That could help scientists in their continued quest to develop low-calorie foods that are more satisfying in the long run.
NPR

Sandy Raises Questions About Climate And The Future

If you ask climate scientist Radley Horton, it's difficult to say that Hurricane Sandy was directly caused by climate change, but he says there are strong connections between the two. He talks with Fresh Air's Terry Gross about climate change and preparing for severe weather events.
NPR

Behind A Halloween Mask, Even 'Good' Kids Can Turn Into Candy Thieves

Results of a 1976 experiment involving masked trick-or-treaters still hold true today: We're more likely to do bad things — like stealing candy — when we're anonymous. And that tells researchers about the ways adults break the rules, too.
NPR

A Morphing Storm: As Sandy Moves Inland, Snow And Winds Follow

The mid-Atlantic region is no stranger to hurricanes, but as Sandy made its way north and onto land, it collided with cold winter weather, wrapping frigid air into its spinning mass.
NPR

More Tips For Feeding The Family, Hurricane Edition

The hand can opener is a storm cook's best friend. Sterno cans, gas grills and portable stoves can be, too, say our readers.
NPR

Why Is This Supercomputer So Superfast?

Titan, potentially the world's fastest computer, comes online at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The supercomputer is designed to do more than 20,000 trillion calculations a second, allowing researchers to model everything from black holes to nuclear reactors. And they'll have video gamers to thank for its blazing speed.

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