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Government Shutdown Delays Rocket Launch

The blastoff of the Minotaur I, operated by Orbital Sciences Corp., has been pushed back after preparations were put on hold during the government hiatus.
NPR

Scientists Grow New Hair In A Lab, But Don't Rush To Buy A Comb

The new method might allow doctors to increase the quantity of hair on your head, instead of just moving it around. But don't get too excited. A cure for baldness is not around the corner. The method has been tested only in mice and can produce only a small amount of strange-looking hair.
NPR

Kansas Farmers Commit To Taking Less Water From The Ground

Water from the Ogallala Aquifer is withdrawn about six times faster than rain or rivers can recharge it. Now, a group of farmers in one part of northwestern Kansas has agreed to pump 20 percent less water out of the aquifer over the next five years.
NPR

Engineering A Cooler Climate, Robo-Roaches, Anoushka Shankar

In this weekend's podcast of All Things Considered, host Arun Rath investigates the controversial practice of engineering the planet's climate with man-made chemicals. Plus, music from Anoushka Shankar and Norah Jones.
NPR

For The Ultimate Getaway, Why Not South Sudan?

You may not find South Sudan at the top of most dream destination lists, but the authors of a new travel guide say the young country, long isolated by a violent civil war, has much to offer tourists in search of wildlife, culture and natural beauty.
NPR

What's Creepy, Crawly And A Champion Of Neuroscience?

The new RoboRoach project allows users to influence the movements of cockroaches with a smartphone. Greg Gage of Backyard Brains says it's not brain control but more like the bridle of a horse. The RoboRoach just provides a sensation that makes the cockroach perceive an obstacle.
NPR

To Fix Climate Change, Scientists Turn To Hacking The Earth

Some very mainstream scientists are saying that the climate change situation is so bad that saving life as we know it might require something radical: like shooting chemicals into the stratosphere or to protect earth from the sun or sucking carbon dioxide from out of the atmosphere.
NPR

Climate Watcher Says He's Done With Flying

Meteorologist Eric Holthaus has made his career monitoring the Earth's climate, and he's alarmed at what he sees. After reading a new, bleak international report on climate change, Holthaus has decided one important way to reduce his carbon footprint is to give up airplane travel for good.
NPR

'It Takes A Crisis': How '73 Embargo Fueled Change In U.S.

When Saudia Arabia cut off direct oil shipments to the U.S. 40 years ago, the country was thrown into shock. Calls for energy independence grew louder. The U.S. is now producing more of its own oil and natural gas than ever, but the commitment to efficiency has been uneven.
NPR

Why Scientists Are Trying Viruses To Beat Back Bacteria

Researchers say naturally occurring viruses that target bacteria might one day help help treat human infections with germs that are resistant to antibiotics. The research is still in the early stages, and there are quite a few challenges to overcome before a treatment can even be tested in humans.

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