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Decades After Lacks' Death, Family Gets A Say On Her Cells

A special committee that includes two members of the Lacks family will review scientists' applications for access to the genetic sequence of cells derived from a tumor that killed Henrietta Lacks. The cells are among the most widely used in research.
NPR

A Patch Designed To Make You Invisible To Mosquitoes

A small, square sticker called the Kite Patch promises to keep mosquitoes away by sending out chemicals that block the bug's ability to sense humans. The inventors say it could be a game changer in the way we prevent mosquito-borne illnesses like West Nile virus.
NPR

Genetic Code Shows Bird Flu In China Spread Between People

Chinese scientists offer the first clear evidence that the H7N9 bird flu virus can be transmitted from human to human. A father, who became sick in March, passed the virus to his daughter. But the risk of transmission is quite low, and the virus still doesn't appear to pose a global threat.
NPR

Earth Scientists Pin Climate Change Squarely On 'Humanity'

The federal government's top climate scientists announced Tuesday that 2012 was really hot — among the top 10 hottest years on record and the hottest ever in the U.S., with rising sea levels, less Arctic sea ice and warmer oceans. And the American Geophysical Union called humanity "the major influence" on global climate change.
NPR

Wells Are Running Dry In Parts Of Kansas

New pumping and irrigation systems made it easy for farmers to extract billions of gallons of water from the High Plains Aquifer. But now, parts of the aquifer are dried out, prompting a debate over how to preserve what once seemed to be an almost inexhaustible resource.
NPR

Heck No Or Let's Go? Your Thoughts On Lab-Grown Meat

Earlier this week, we told you about the world's first burger grown in a lab from stem cells. We've chosen a few comments about the technology, which range from disgusted to admiring.
NPR

Study: Rising Military Suicide Rate Not Linked To Deployment

A new study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association says the rising number of suicides in the military cannot be blamed on deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan. But other studies say there is a link and many researchers caution that the factors leading to suicide are complex and unique for each individual, so they question whether the findings should guide treatment.
NPR

The Cotton Candy Grape: A Sweet Spin On Designer Fruit

Grapes that taste like cotton candy? No, it's not a GMO experiment but rather the result of good old-fashioned plant-breeding techniques. One scientist has already brought these sweet treats to the market and hopes our grape choices will one day be as varied as our apple choices.
NPR

Space Robot Designed As Companion For Japanese Astronaut

Japan has launched a humanoid robot bound for the International Space Station to keep one of its astronauts company.
NPR

NASA Marks Curiosity's First Year On Mars

One year ago, NASA's Curiosity rover landed on Mars. We look at the science the mission has accomplished and the strange gravity anomaly engineers stumbled onto at the bottom of Gale Crater, where the rover landed.

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