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In NASA's Budget: Plans To 'Shrink-Wrap' An Asteroid

There's $78 million of the agency's nearly $18 billion budget set aside for a program to capture a 500-ton asteroid in space and drag it back to orbit around the moon. And by 2021, astronauts could be visiting that asteroid to study it up close and gather samples.
NPR

A Legal Twist In The Effort To Ban Cameras From Livestock Plants

Legislation introduced in several states would require anyone who records evidence of animal abuse to turn it over to authorities within a set period of time. But animal rights activists aren't welcoming these measures: They see the bills as veiled attempts to stifle long-term undercover investigations that can prove a pattern of abuse.
NPR

Leading Man's Chin: Universally Hot Or Not?

A prominent male chin, thought to be a marker for virility, is one of the characteristics that's part of the so-called universal facial attractiveness hypothesis. But a look at chins from around the world raises doubts.
NPR

How Much Does It Hurt? Let's Scan Your Brain

Researchers say they can measure how much pain someone is experiencing and even watch as prescription painkillers relieve it. The scanning technique could help doctors treat pain better, but the work is also fraught with questions about how the technology could interfere with the relationship between doctors and patients.
WAMU 88.5

Clinical Trials And Premature Babies

Many universities reportedly failed to inform parents about the risks to their premature babies of an oxygen study. Understanding risks and benefits of clinical trials.

NPR

Cities Turn Sewage Into 'Black Gold' For Local Farms

Cities are finding beneficial and lucrative ways to dispose of solid waste, while also helping farmers. But a lot of sewage still ends up in landfills or being processed at big, industrial incinerators.
NPR

Feds Fault Preemie Researchers For Ethical Lapses

Infants received different levels of oxygen to see which was better at preventing blindness without increasing the risk of nerve damage or death. But the federal government says doctors in the study didn't tell parents enough in advance about the "foreseeable risks" to their children.
NPR

Earliest Cookware Was Used To Make Fish Soup

Humans were using cookware as early as 15,000 years ago, according to a new analysis of ancient Japanese ceramic pots. Those first meals? Fish soup.
NPR

Test-Tube Baby Pioneer Dies

Sir Robert Edwards, whose research led to the world's first "test-tube baby," overcame enormous controversy surrounding his work.

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