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What Makes A Star Starry? Is It Me?

Draw a planet (a circle, right?). Now draw a star (a pointy thing, yes?). Now ask yourself, aren't stars all round? Our sun is. So why do we make them pointy? Come learn the answer.
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Solar Flare Could Trigger Auroras Tonight For Northern U.S.

The X-class Coronal Mass Ejection, or CME, that erupted on the sun on Wednesday is not expected to cause major disruptions to the electrical grid or communications.
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Scientists Name Swamp-Creature Fossil After Mick Jagger

They discovered signs of a water nymph that lived 19 million years ago. It's called Jaggermeryx naida because in imagining this creature, they were reminded of Jagger by its "mobile and tactile lips."
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Crocodile Meets Godzilla — A Swimming Dino Bigger Than T. Rex

It roamed land and sea and snacked on giant fish. The first few spinosaurus bones were discovered a century ago, but destroyed in WWII. A more complete, second specimen reveals a terrifying predator.
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SeaWorld Hopes New Orca Habitats Will Stem A Tide Of Criticism

The theme park says a 2013 documentary critical of its captive orca attraction has hurt its bottom line. Now, it's pushing back with a social media campaign and plans for new habitats for its whales.
NPR

Fossil Of 'Jaggermeryx' Found Namesake In Another Stone

Scientists have named an extinct pig-like creature with big lips after Mick Jagger. Their findings will be published in the September issue of the Journal of Paleontology.
NPR

Some Things You Can Do In Your Sleep, Literally

For those who think there are not enough hours in the day, researchers may have just offered you a solution. The brain can continue tasks even while asleep, a study finds. Texting not included, alas.
NPR

Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn't

In many countries, eggs aren't refrigerated and they're still considered safe to eat. But in the U.S., we have to chill them, because we've washed away the cuticle that protects them from bacteria.

NPR

Ozone Levels Bounce Back, Showing First Increase In 35 Years

NASA says that a ban on CFCs enacted in the 1980s has contributed to a 4 percent rebound since 2000 in atmospheric ozone in mid-northern latitudes.
NPR

Souls Tumbling In The Light

Every fall, birds head south and, around Sept. 11, New York sends two beams into the sky. When birds and lights collide, that could mean trouble — but New York is surprisingly gentle.

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