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Element 115 Could Be Near Elusive 'Island Of Stability'

Researchers in Sweden have confirmed the existence of element 115. It sticks around for a surprisingly long time. Scientists believe it may bring them closer to the mythical "island of stability" a whole slew of super-heavy elements that could last for days or even years.
NPR

How To Disappear When Someone's Spying On You; 'Privacy Wear' Comes To Market

A New York design team has just produced an invisibility cloak for your cell phone. Pop it in and no government, no merchants, no friends, no one knows where your phone is. Another design team in Canada says they could do stuff like this — but they won't. Who's right?
NPR

To Grow Sweeter Produce, California Farmers Turn Off The Water

California's small producers of tomatoes, grapes and other crops are increasingly taking up dry farming, which involves growing crops without watering them for months. The technique, which obviously saves water, can produce more flavorful crops.
NPR

Hole Or Whole, Why Can Our Brains Hear The Difference?

Late summer tends to be a slow month for news. But at All Things Considered, we put on a two hour program, no matter what. So — without a trace of irony — one of our science correspondents offered to help fill some holes in the show with a series of stories about holes. Today he looks at how the brain copes with the ambiguity of "the hole idea," and "the whole idea."
NPR

Sophisticated Prosthetics Help Liberate Disabled Adventurers

New technology is revolutionizing disabled peoples' ability to have the kind of outdoor adventures many had before losing functionality in their limbs. Amputees and people with spinal cord injuries are now off-road hand cycling, rock climbing and whitewater kayaking. Companies making innovative new gear describe cool recent innovations and challenges they're still working on. Disabled adventurers experienced and new to the scene talk about liberation through technology.
NPR

Turning Off The Spigot In Western Kansas Farmland

If Kansas farmers keep pumping water out of the High Plains aquifer as they have in the past, the amount of water they can extract will start to fall in just 10 years or so, scientists predict. That will cause big changes in the agricultural economy. But reducing water use now could help delay and ease that disruption.
NPR

Beachgoers In Spain Face Invasion Of Jellyfish

Known for its sparkling turquoise waters and white sand, Spain's Mediterranean beaches are developing a new reputation — for a growing number of jellyfish. Scientists blame overfishing and, possibly, climate change for the spike in stinging invertebrates.
WAMU 88.5

Battling Wildfires In The West

Thousands of firefighters are struggling to control a giant wildfire threatening Yosemite National Park and San Francisco's water supply.

NPR

Far Out: Voyager 1 Might Be Over The Edge, Into Deep Space

For the past decade, scientists have been waiting for the Voyager 1 spacecraft to cross into deep space. New research suggests it has left the solar system, but other scientists say it's still inside the sun's sphere of influence. (This piece initially aired Aug. 19, 2013, on Morning Edition.)
NPR

Tons Of Molten Glass Go Into Making Mirror For Giant Telescope

One of seven large mirrors for the 72-foot telescope will be spun cast at the University of Arizona on Saturday.

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