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Can You Hear Me Now? Cellphone Satellites Phone Home

Never mind the big-budget NASA satellites. A team of young engineers has tricked out a few off-the-shelf cellphones and sent them to space. The smartphones are already above us, sending images and data back to ham radio operators on Earth.
NPR

Monkeys Also Want To Eat Like The Locals

When monkeys move to a new place, they want to eat what the locals are eating, a new study finds. It's among the first to see strong social behaviors in eating among wild animals.
NPR

Researchers Find Hormone That Grows Insulin-Producing Cells

When researchers turned on a gene for the hormone in the livers of diabetic lab mice, the number of insulin-making cells in their pancreas glands tripled within 10 days. Although the research was conducted in animals, the scientists say the findings could be relevant for humans.
NPR

Not Your Ordinary Science Fair

Today's young people might aim for the sky, but they might not envision a visit to the White House. Host Michel Martin talks with two students, Darius Hooker and Isabella Leighton, about their interest in rocket science and the White House Science Fair.
NPR

A Tale Of Mice And Medical Research, Wiped Out By A Superstorm

When Superstorm Sandy flooded lower Manhattan last year, thousands of lab animals drowned and many scientists lost months or even years of work. The specialty animals can be very difficult to replace, but researchers say the loss of animal life is emotionally devastating and difficult to get over.
NPR

1960s Satellite Images Add To Evidence Of Shrinking Sea Ice

A new analysis of images taken from one of the first U.S. weather satellites appears to confirm shrinking Arctic sea ice.
NPR

Deadly Strain Of Bird Flu Is 'Most Lethal' Flu Virus Yet

At a briefing in Beijing Wednesday, World Health Organization officials called the H7N9 bird flu that's emerged in China one of the "most lethal" flu viruses so far. NPR science correspondent Richard Knox talks about what we know, and the questions that remain about the deadly strain.

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