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Some People Really Can Taste The Rainbow

Some people with a rare neurological condition known as synesthesia can taste shapes or smell color. And when these people work in the food industry, it can radically redefine flavor profiles. (Blue wine? Moss-flavored cotton candy?)
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Scientists Catalog Individual Dust Particles

Invisible dust particles are constantly swirling around in the air. And depending on what's in those particles, they may be affecting our health. Researchers have trapped individual dust particles, and analyzed their unique chemical makeup to create a dust particle library.
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VIDEO: See Comet Pan-STARRS Dragging Its Tail Through Space

The comet's now putting on a show in the Northern Hemisphere's night sky. Using its orbiting observatories, NASA captured a stereo view from space that offers a unique perspective.
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A Peek Into Exoplanet's Atmosphere Offers Clues To How It Was Formed

Scientists say the discovery of more carbon than oxygen and no methane in the atmosphere of a gas giant favors one theory of solar system formation.
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Physicists Tie Water Into Knots

Reporting in the journal Nature Physics, William Irvine and Dustin Kleckner, physicists at the University of Chicago, have created a knotted fluid vortex in the lab — a scientific first, they say. The knots resemble smoke rings — except these are made of water, and they're shaped like pretzels, not donuts. Understanding knottiness has extra-large applications, like understanding dynamics of the sun.
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Can Just One Concussion Change the Brain?

Suffering a single concussion may cause lasting brain damage, researchers report in the journal Radiology. Steven Flanagan, co-director of the Concussion Center at NYU Langone Medical Center, discusses the findings, and why diagnosing a concussion is so difficult.
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And The Award For Best Picture Goes To....

More than 450 photographers submitted a shot to SciFri's Winter Nature Photo Contest, and thousands of fans helped choose a winner. Contest judge Clay Bolt discusses the winning entry, and what makes for a prize-winning shot. Plus, tips for budding nature photographers.
NPR

Arming Fat Cells to Fight Brain Cancer

Harvesting stem cells from human fat may be an effective way to treat brain cancer, researchers report in the journal PLoS One. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa, of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, explains how fat cells can be used as Trojan horses to fight cancer.

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