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How Much Water Actually Goes Into Making A Bottle Of Water?

The bottled water industry says it uses water far more efficiently than other beverages. But water activists say that few companies in the beverage industry are calculating their total water footprint.
NPR

A Japanese iPhone Gadget Teases The Tummy With Food Smells

Scentee draws power from an iPhone to blast you with the smell of hearty meat or lavender. But could the synthetic smell of meat trick your brain into thinking you're eating meat instead of plain rice?
NPR

Scientists: Asian Carp Breeding In Great Lake Tributaries

A U.S. Geological Survey study finds that the Asian grass carp is living and breeding in the Sandusky River, which flows into Lake Erie.
NPR

Science On Shaky Ground As Automatic Budget Cutbacks Drag On

As the cuts made under the sequester continue, scientists worry that U.S. research will fall behind. Budget cuts already are delaying plans for equipment upgrades and preventing new research — and a new generation of researchers — from getting underway.
NPR

How To See Forever On Your Dirty Car

When you fall in love with science, ordinary, everyday stuff can suddenly seem extraordinary. That's how NPR Blogger and astrophysicist Adam Frank sees it — today he sees it in dust.
NPR

Eeek, Snake! Your Brain Has A Special Corner Just For Them

Humans and other primates have really good vision. One scientist thinks that ability evolved in part to help monkeys and humans quickly recognize venomous snakes. When monkeys see photos of snakes, neurons in a specific part of the brain light up. The neurons respond to photos of the reptiles more than to monkey faces.
NPR

What You Need To Know About Babies, Toddlers And Screen Time

Researchers are still learning about the effects of touch-screens on kids. But scientists say that certain kinds of screen time, involving interaction with other people, can help youngsters learn.
NPR

Predicting Quakes Still Shaky, But Being Prepared Is Crucial

In Southern California and communities from St. Louis to Seattle, millions of Americans live in areas at risk for earthquake. But many have not taken simple steps to protect themselves — and seismologist can only provide limited warning.
NPR

Is Rebuilding Storm-Struck Coastlines Worth The Cost?

Since Hurricane Sandy struck the East Coast a year ago, the federal government has spent millions to repair the devastation. But with a changing climate, more storms — and more damage — are likely on the way. A geologist argues it's time to rethink the strategy, but Long Beach locals are thankful for the rebuilding efforts.
NPR

Fish Sauce: An Ancient Roman Condiment Rises Again

We usually associate fish sauce with Southeast Asian cooking. But it turns out the briny condiment also has deep roots in Europe, dating back to the Roman Empire. What caused its decline? Historians say it boils down to taxes, and pirates.

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