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Organic Farmers Bash FDA Restrictions On Manure Use

Many organic farmers are hopping mad right now at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Their reason? Fertilizer. The FDA, as part of its overhaul of food safety regulations, wants to limit the use of animal manure, which organic farmers call a precious resource and a basis of their farming practices.
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At Climate Meeting, Tensions Rise Between Rich And Poor Nations

At the United Nations climate talks in Warsaw, Poland, conflict between rich and poor nations is mounting. The developing world wants large sums of money to help them adapt to climate change. The U.S. and Europe say they're doing what they can to help but times are tough.
NPR

Poor Countries Push Rich Nations To Do More On Climate Change

Delegates to the U.N. climate change conference in Poland from many of the world's poorer nations are asking wealthier countries to pay compensation to the impoverished countries bearing the brunt of climate change. Melissa Block talks to Munjurul Hannan Khan, negotiator and spokesman for the Least Developed Countries Group about the tensions between rich and poor countries.
NPR

Can A Fish Farm Be Organic? That's Up For Debate

The federal government is struggling to figure out how to fit fish farms into the National Organic Program, which regulates organic land-based farms. Environmentalists argue that fish farms shouldn't quality for an organic label if they don't use organic feed.
WAMU 88.5

Historic Launch Puts Satellite Built By Fairfax Students Into Orbit

It was a momentous day at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia Tuesday night, as a group of current and former students from Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology saw the satellite they built put into orbit.

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First Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space

The first satellite ever developed by high school students to make it to space is believed to be orbiting Earth after getting a ride aboard a U.S. military rocket Tuesday night from Wallops Island, Va. Fittingly, perhaps, you can send it a text message.
NPR

Why College Campuses Get Hit By Meningitis Outbreaks

Princeton University is asking students to get vaccinated with a shot not approved for use in the U.S. in an effort to stop a meningitis outbreak. Meningitis can be deadly, and it spreads in places where people are in close contact, like a dormitory or a prison.
NPR

Study: Commuting Adversely Affects Political Engagement

Researchers think an increase in commuting may be partly to blame for widespread political disengagement among many Americans. As stressed-out commuters disengage, they leave the political arena to the most partisan voters.
NPR

How And Where Should We Rebuild After Natural Disasters?

There will be more big typhoons, some in poor countries, some in wealthier regions. But one thing we all share is a difficulty in keeping the next disaster in mind as we rebuild. Most cities are coastal, where even the certainty of big losses hasn't dissuaded people from moving into harm's way.
NPR

Meat Mummies: How Ancient Egyptians Prepared Feasts For Afterlife

Eternity is a long time to keep meat fresh for pharaoh. New research reveals the chemical secrets of ancient Egyptian beef and poultry "meat mummies" that were buried alongside the dearly departed to feed them in the great beyond.

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