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The Inside Story On The Fear Of Holes

Images that evoke a phobic reaction to holes have unique characteristics in terms of contrast and fine detail. Researchers found they were similar in some respects to features of venomous animals.
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Lights Out In Venezuela; President Blames Opposition Saboteurs

Nicholas Maduro blames says a "low-level war" was the cause of an electricity outage that affected 70 percent of the country, including the capital, Caracas.
NPR

A Greener Way To Cool Your Foods On The Way To The Grocery Store

Most of the trucks that haul your fruits, vegetables and frozen foods to the store are currently cooled by diesel engines, not the cleanest of technologies. But researchers are working on a cooling system based on fuel cells to keep your food cool while it travels.
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Tailgaters Rejoice! This Cooler Keeps Beers Cold Without Ice

Just in time for the return of football season comes the Case Coolie, an innovation that aims to put an end to packing and hauling a cooler around. "It's a waste of electricity to freeze the ice and a waste of water," says product co-founder Nick Niehaus.
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Bald Eagles Are Back In A Big Way — And The Talons Are Out

Decimated by hunters, insecticides and other human pressures in the 1960s and 1970s, America's emblematic bird is once again flying high. Roughly 10,000 mated pairs now nest in the continental U.S., up from about 500 in the 1970s. But more birds also means fierce competition for territory and mates.
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Now A Test Can Tell If Your Pricey Cup Of Cat Poop Coffee Is Fake

The world's most expensive coffee can cost $600 a pound, and it comes from — there's no delicate way to put it — civet poop. But how do you know if what you're shelling out for is the real deal? Chemists have come up with the world's first cat poop coffee test.
NPR

How To Build Little Doors Inside Your Shell: The Secrets of Snail Carpentry

Snails getting ready for winter are natural carpenters. They construct doors, or maybe you'd call them walls, inside their shells. They do this without hammers, nails or cement. Instead, they use their foot — and of course, their favorite material, mucus. Welcome to the ingenious world of snail construction.
NPR

U.S. 'Space Fence' Radar System Goes Silent, After 50 Years

The U.S. Air Force has pulled the plug on a radar system that tracks thousands of objects orbiting Earth, from satellites and debris to meteors. The military says the shutdown can save $14 million annually. A replacement plan is in the works.
NPR

The Latest In Scientific Field Equipment? Fido's Nose

Conservationists around the world are using a new kind of field equipment. It can navigate difficult terrain, detect tiny chemical samples, and ... wag its tail. Detection dogs are teaming up with humans to study rare, endangered and invasive organisms.
NPR

Pollution, Not Rising Temperatures, May Have Melted Alpine Glaciers

About 160 years ago, before Europe began warming up, glaciers in the Alps started rapidly retreating. Now NASA scientists offer a possible explanation for this apparent paradox: Soot from the Industrial Revolution could have heated up the ice.

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